DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm planning on re-doing the rooftop deck at a condo we just purchased. One of the Condo board requirements for doing any work on your unit is that all contractors provide an insurance certificate (naming condo board and management company as additional insureds) for at least $1,000,000 general liability (and $500,000 worker's comp). In the event I can't sweet talk the Board into just letting me screw down some deck boards without getting the mayor involved, does anyone know how I'd go about getting an insurance policy like this and what it would cost? I'm hoping there's some kind of short term add-on to my H06 insurance policy that could meet this requirement inexpensively and easily. Entire project should take no more than a month, tops. This is my first place so I'm pretty new to everything - any insight is appreciated. Thanks.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
25,769 Posts
You will not get that policy---You can't get workmans comp as the owner of a business, A homeowner will never get it.

You're cooked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm assuming the WC insurance would be pointless here since there are no workers to cover as I will be doing the work myself - and I would expect the Board would agree, no? There's no employees to even file a claim. Assuming I can get around the WC piece, any ideas on the liability insurance piece? I'll obviously be talking to my insurance agent but I'm just wondering if there's a simple solution I am overlooking or if this is a common request. And whether anyone has a ballpark figure on what the insurance would cost.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
25,769 Posts
It all depends on the board---Next door at Contractor Talk a cabinet maker with all insurances needed was barred from installing the cabinets he made because he was a sole proprietor of a business and as such could not get workmans comp--nor did he need it by state statute.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,147 Posts
it is important to note that most insurance policies do not cover DIY projects. so i think this is why maybe the umbrella idea would not work because umbrella is an expansion of a currently existing policy - which probably doesn't cover DIY reno. so it is important to be very clear to insurance company what your plans are.

Knucklez
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Wow, that sounds like a crazy board, oh'mike. Mine seems pretty reasonable so far and my neighbor is on the board so hopefully they will be a little more logical. After all, it's just a matter of running some stringers and laying down deckboards about 3" above the roof grade. The parapet walls extend vertically on all sides about 48" above the level of the deck so I won't have to worry about railings or material blowing off the building, etc. There's not a whole lot of risk here so I'm really only interested in getting the bare minimum to satisfy the board and allow me to build my deck in peace. Guess I'll just have to talk to my agent and see what the process is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
From the definition in the by-laws, is the roof itself a "common area" which your deck is attached to?
If so, then the board can hire and pay someone to make sure it's sealed before additional material is attached to its existing mounting structure.

I can see the logic in their stringent policy though:
Somebody chops a hole in the roof, it slowly leaks over time, black mold grows in the walls of the ten units below, kids and gramps get sick, roof finally collaspes from rot in the middle of winter leaving hundreds homeless. (o.k. so this is a little dramatic but you get the point).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I believe the roof would be classified as a limited common area in this instance - the roof itself is the responsibility of the Association but it is private to my unit. The structure sitting on the roof (deck) is my responsibility and is private to my unit. The Board said that the Association would re-roof the area under the existing deck whenever I want to replace the deck, at the Association's expense...to prevent owners from having to rip up a brand new deck in a short time to work on the roof. That's a good, sensible policy. Hopefully that means they will be sensible when I tell them I want to build the deck myself!
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top