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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My kitchen has a corian countertop with a sink mounted beneath the counter.

I'm trying to replace the faucet with a single handle unit. There is a ring to screw on underneath the counter to secure the faucet.

Underneath the counter, next to the center hole for the faucet there is a metal stud that is glued to the counter.
The stud is used to secure a 1/4' piece of wood that runs along the back of the undermount sink to support it.

My problen is the stud is too close to the center hole and interferes with the ring that secures the faucet so I can't tighten the faucet down.

Can I remove the stud by heating it and melting the glue? Would a propane torch be the right thing to use?

It seems the back of the sink needs support and I should glue the stud back on in another position.
What kind of glue do I need for that?

I know the easiest thing to do is by a two handled faucet, but I like the one I have.

Thanks for any suggestions.
 

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Definitely do not use a torch or heat gun! It is probably not just glued on but also drilled into the Corian. Heating the stud enough to release the epoxy may crack or discolor the Corian above.

You might be able to hacksaw off the offending length of the stud and/or shim around the hole to the height of the stud or remaining stud.
 

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I would use a hacksaw. Use one of those blade holders that holds one end only. That will allow you to bend the blade and saw flush to the bottom of the stud.

Consider also, depending on the actual situation you're facing, the possibility of making changes to how you affix the faucet. For example, you could slip a closely fitting short length of pipe over the main threads of the faucet stem to "raise" (or lower depending on how you look at it) the retaining ring away from the stud. Or perhaps find a ring with a lesser circumference.

As far as re-attaching the stud to the counter, use general-purpose epoxy.
 
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