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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I read the manual. I was using zero orbital function on both the easy and difficult pieces of wood. Same blade. Nothing changed except the wood.

You've never heard of Craftsman? I'm guessing you're younger, or from outside North America, cause Craftsman was around before many of the current popular brands. Maybe since the 50s or 60s. That brand name used to be owned by Sears. Legendary for quality and reliability. Now, Lowes bought the brand, I believe.
 

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I read the manual. I was using zero orbital function on both the easy and difficult pieces of wood. Same blade. Nothing changed except the wood.
Did you test the full orbital mode, should have cut faster. For your application that should be fine, but a test is always good.

Bud
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I did, but that test would be irrelevant. Why go introducing new variables when you're trying to isolate existing ones. That's basic science.



Again, the saw cut the first piece of wood perfectly.
 

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lenaitch: Maybe, but if it was so wrong, why did it cut the first, thicker piece easily and perfectly. Because it might have been softwood? Don't know. I'm looking at one of the Craftsman jigsaw models, but it use an Allen key to tighten the blade. I'm not fond of that. Still considering it, though.

Dunno. You might have cooked the blade doing the first cut because it was cheap, tool speed or feed speed too fast. As mentioned, PB is full of glue that will really heat the blade. I don't use one that much but tend to treat my blades like I do drill bits - disposable.
 

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Don't get mad, let's try the science you are looking for.
1. Using the up and down mode will dull the blade quicker, thus your first cut may have been good but the blade was already on its way to toast.
2. Testing the orbital mode with a new sharp blade could answer your concerns if it continues to cut for a longer time.

Substitution is a normal way to resolve problems, but you will need to get more blades. As for blades there are several to choose from besides just wood vs metal. I forget the tooth count at the moment but not too fine or too course should be good. Also a higher quality.

Bud
 

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My first reciprocating saw was black&decker and at the time I think it and the craftsman were considered about the same in tool quality. Not that craftsman was ever considered first rate power tool. At the time I started, it was porter-cable, milwaukee and such. Pros were using skillsaw and milwaukee sawsall, I think. Bostitch or maybe senco nailers. The way pros and layman see a tool is from apples to oranges. I like apples.:smile:
 

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Thanks. I thought of that too. I used the blade marked "wood" on it. As I said, it worked perfectly for the first, thicker piece of particle board. I could try another blade, but that would mean going to HD and shelling out more money for something that may not even work.
This is without a doubt one of the dumbest things I have ever heard. You used the same blade for 1.5 HOURS and you think it's not dull? Its turned blue from heat (sure sign of a dull blade) and you think its "risky" to try and buy a new blade?

Blades get dull. Replace the blade! Once it heats up and turns blue, and doesnt cut anymore, you will replace THAT blade. That's how it works. It is not the fault of the saw.
 

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Likely you overheated the blade getting through the first piece, and then it dulled very quickly in the second. Another possibility is that when you cut the first one, the glue that got on the blade didn't have a chance to cool and harden on the blade until you finished cutting the first piece. When you went to cut the second piece, the glue on the blade increased the friction, causing overheating of the blade and the glue on the teeth of the blade made them effectively dull.


I've had the same issue with carbide tipped blades on my table saw from cutting laminate flooring - no matter how expensive the blade, it's a one-and-done proposition.

If the saw was still moving the blade like it was supposed to, it's not a problem with the saw.
 

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Who mentioned feed speed? I was thinking that if you didn't press so hard to get the job done fast then heat buildup would be less.

Go a little, then let off the forward pressure to let the blade cool, then go a little more, etc.

I think this will make the blade last longer.

As far as orbital goes, either your saw has it or your saw does not . If your saw don't have orbital, try the preceding stop and go cutting anyway to see if it helps make the blade last longer.

(Does not help if the blade is already toast. It only takes a small amount of experience to see (visual inspection) when the teeth are dulled.)
 

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I think his saw has orbital, but he read the instructions and for some reason decided to not use it. ???

Bud
 

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Does the t-shank have any advantages other than quick change of blades? Since I rarely use the saw, quick change blades won't be much of an advantage for me. I thought I read somewhere that T-shank blades are less likely to come loose or fall out, yes?

The only other advantage I have seen with T shank blades, besides quick change, is availability. I have my dad's jig saw from the late 40's or early 50's, Black & Decker believe it or not, and particularly when I have wanted something other than plain jane blades, maybe narrower ones for cutting patterns or whatever, I had to look a little harder for them. This was built when B&D was top notch, built like a brick outhouse. Part of the reason it's still going is that jig saws are not one of the most commonly used tools, but in addition to general use I remember dad making dozens of cradles and things like that for church bazaar's and whatnot, and I have made dozens of yard figurines, full size animal silhouettes, three dimensional angels, ornate birdhouses, etc., and that thing keeps ticking. A couple of years ago I noticed it was getting a little more than warm so finished what I was working on, took it apart, replaced the motor bearings, and it's cool as a cucumber again. But, just like any of them, it only works as well as the blade that is used. And no, that's one does not get loaned out, under any circumstances.
 

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My advice would be to focus less on the jigsaw itself and direct your attention to the blade. Purchasing the correct blade for the application is key. Problem is a lot of blades are advertised like "wood" "metal" "laminate" "particle board" and the difficult part is one blades might be advertised to handle it all. I would usually suggest buying a blade advertised for the material in question such as : https://www.boschtools.com/us/en/boschtools-ocs/t-shank-jig-saw-blades-for-wood-t308bo-35144-p/

but I will also suggest this blade :https://www.boschtools.com/us/en/boschtools-ocs/t-shank-jig-saw-blades-for-wood-t128bhm1-188010-p/

Really 2 different blades but one might work better for *you*. Don't be afraid to try different rpm's and orbital functions on you saw. If a blade turns colors or the teeth look different than brand new it is toast. Blades are cheap compared to your time and tools health.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Well I finally got around to buying some new blades. I heard what was said about Bosch blades. I'll buy them when I have a chance. But I managed to find Dewalt blades of the exact same type that came with saw that I told you all about. I bought a few because that would give me a chance to do an apples to apples comparison.

I tried a new, identical blade in the saw, and it cut through regular particle board and thin (3/8") oak flooring like butter. Without use of any orbital action. It was so fast I was shocked. My next step will be to try same blade in that awful particle board that appeared to cause the first blade to burn. I just haven't had time yet. I just my furnace replaced (with some great advice on the HVAC forum here). I also had my water heater replaced. Finally, I"m getting help with an electronics project I'm building.

My next step will be to see what happens when the new blade goes into that nasty plywood. But at first glance, yeah, it looks like the saw has plenty of power. I decided to keep it, and hope it will do any job I might be likely to come across. Again, I'm not a tradesman, so I'm fairly sure I won't need to cut material nearly as challenging as some of you do.



BTW, is bamboo considered hard or soft wood?
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Well, that's reassuring, cause I also tested it on some bamboo floor boards and the saw/blade sliced through them like butter.


Next stop: Try the "evil" particle board again and see if it ruins this blade. If it does, then I know for sure it was that particle board.
 
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