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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Happy New Year....

So I'm looking to convert my garage into a playroom for my son. I have attached very basic diagram I created in Paint. I apologize in advance. The two areas I will have trouble with is the flooring and area where the garage door is.

I want to raise the floor to match the height of the kitchen on the other side of the joint wall with garage. The garage slab is a disaster. It has shifted in a few spots and not level. I just moved into the house 3 months ago and previous owner said the garage got water from one of the gutters. He corrected the gutter issue and I have notice no water in garage at all. We have had some pretty intense rain and snow storms and completely dry.

The floor needs to be raised about 8 inches total. I will be putting hardwood for a finished floor. Can i just use joist anchors on both walls and add some support in the middle of the floor? The garage is 23 x 12.5 with the joists running the 12.5 length. There is small foundation wall running around the entire garage accept where the garage door is obviously. The joists would hang right above that foundation wall probably about an inch or so above it. Sounds like hanging joists and shimming bottom for extra precaution be a place to start? I'm one for overcompensating. Kids will be running and jumping on this so I'm really not looking for any bounce, just a solid floor.

As far as the garage door section. I plan on adding a regular entry door with a possible window next to it. Should I build up a foundation wall there to match the rest of the room and then add the framing for door/wall? Or could I just put pressure treated wood as the bottom plate on top of the slab and build the frame that way?

Any comments and critiquing is encouraged. Thanks for the help in advance.
 

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Going to be dealing with a bunch of issues that need to be addressed before doing anything.
Going to need to go through zoning, building departments to get permits.
Add a closet and and it will be considered a possible bedroom, then the health dept. gets involved.
Unless you get rid of the apron and add a block stem wall where the over head door was water will get under the wall.
Unless there was foam insulation and a vapor barrier under that slab moisture can be an issue under the floor.
Pictures are always nice.
 
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Is there a HOA for where you live? Ours won't approve the removal of a garage door and subsequent replacement with a framed wall. I have seen one homeowner do it, but a month or two later, he had put the garage door back up. It appears he nailed it to the opening and left the other stuff intact.

Looking back to 1983, I enclosed my 2 car garage in a house I was living in. I hired a contractor to pour concrete to bring the slab up to grade of the rest of the house. I removed the door from the kitchen and made a walk through.

The garage doors were removed and the openings framed in with one 3x5 window in each. I trimmed out the outside with T-111 siding. For air conditioning, I installed a Window style air conditioner into an outside wall. It had a heat strip for winter time.

I also built a three car garage in the back yard with entrance from the side street.

Recently, I drove by the old place and everything is still standing! :)

The city approved all of my plans.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry, was away for a few. So I spoke to a contractor and he spoke to the building department regarding what I wanted to be done. Building Department said a stem wall ontop of the existing slab is needed. The contractor said just add rebar into slab and pour the concrete.

No HOA and I believe at least 2 hours in my neighborhood have converted theirs into living space. I thought about pouring concrete and raising it to a the level I desire. Two issues. First one is that the current slab has all shifted so believe that would all have to be torn up and then repoured. Second, would be how hard the concrete would be if my son fell on it. I guess I could just put sleepers, insulation and cushion it that way. I'm looking for the most cost effective way to do this and obviously do it right the first time.

Any idea what the going price would be to pour concrete up about 8 inches in a 280 sq ft room? I've been meaning to call around but haven't had the chance yet.
 
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