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We are thinking about selling a house with fuse box. That will be an issue with inspectors and potential buyers. I want to convert it to circuit breakers. I would really like to use a bus conversion kit so I can use the old enclosure and not have to re-route ALL the wires (possibly having to lengthen many of them). The house is wired with 12 awg Romex. The joints are soldered and taped. Installed in 1972. <--yes, they cheaped out and used fuses.

Has anyone done this?
Are the kits good?
What was your experience?
 

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sometimes just moving around old wires is enough to break them
or the insulation crcks and falls off
you will have to be super carefull
 

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To start with, there's nothing wrong with fuses as long as it's a good installation. People tend to see fuses and immediately panic when there is no reason to do so. But it is true, it will turn off many buyers.

Retrofit kits are not great. They can be fussy to get installed and you always end up with an undersized panel that you can easily outgrow. There are only a couple of good reasons to ever use them. One is if removing the old panel enclosure would create a need for asbestos abatement. The other is to avoid damage to irreplaceable paneling. Avoiding drywall or plaster repair might be another, but those are both easy enough to do. Cables or conductors are easily spliced, it's not a big issue when installing a new panel. If that's your only reason for using one of the kits then I would recommend you reconsider.

Your current fuse box might not even be large enough to install one with enough circuit spaces. Newer codes require much more wire bending and wire channel space than in the past. An older cramped enclosure won't support many circuits.

What would worry me more is the solder and tape connections. I'm not so old that I remember when that was an acceptable method, but I don't think it was OK in 1972. In any case, it's a failure prone method that I would remedy before showing the house to an inspector.
 

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What would worry me more is the solder and tape connections. I'm not so old that I remember when that was an acceptable method, but I don't think it was OK in 1972. In any case, it's a failure prone method that I would remedy before showing the house to an inspector.
Failure prone? Eaten by the flux? Just curious.

I've never seen these connections but I believe they are still allowed here.
 

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Failure prone? Eaten by the flux? Just curious.

I've never seen these connections but I believe they are still allowed here.
Cracks in the solder develop from vibration and thermal cycling. Once that occurs, only mechanical tension of the wire and tape hold the connection together.
 
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