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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Probably a dumb question here. We recently bought a house that has a propane cooktop. It sucks. We want to eventually replace it with either a better propane range or a glass cooktop. For a glass cooktop, we'd need a 240 v outlet, whereas there is currently a 120 v outlet.

How big of a job is it to change this over from a 120 v outlet to 240 v? Is it a matter of a new breaker and a new plug? Or would it involve ripping out the old wiring and putting new in? Obviously, the latter would be prohibitive.

House was built in 2015. And, of course, we'd have a licensed electrician take care of this.

I've Googled a bit on it, but have seen different answers.
 

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It would take a new circuit from the panel.
Even if you could convert the 120 to 240, the circuit size would be too small.
 

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Unless you don't mind burning down your house.



The electric cooktop wants more amperage (even at 240) than the wires to your existing 120 output can handle. It would trip the breaker. A new breaker just allows the wire to overheat.
 

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Weird, there are websites that explain how to do it, but sounds here like it's not feasible.

All I needed to know, thanks!
You can change it to 240, but the circuit will not be large enough to handle the stove.
You would also lose any other receptacles on that circuit.
 

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Obviously, in a practical sense 3 wires are enough (technically, only 2 are required to provide the 240V), but I was told 4 wires were required by code for a new 240V circuit. Is that incorrect?
In most cases, but some stoves use only 240 without a neutral.
 

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Most homes are built with the range circuit. 240 at 50 amps. Not sure a home can pass inspection without it?
It is possible the OP has what he needs already installed?
The OP should open up the receptacle and see whats inside and report back.
He may just have to rearrange the wires in the panel and install the needed/correct receptacle behind the range.

I had this happen not all the long ago.
 

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A range needs at least 40 amps. P.S.- remember 2- 20 amp breakers (double pole) does not make 40.

I'm glad you clarified that. Yes, if a stove says it requires 40 amps at 240V (which most do), it has to be wired for each of the wires to carry 40 amps (#8 wires, I think).
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Most homes are built with the range circuit. 240 at 50 amps. Not sure a home can pass inspection without it?
It is possible the OP has what he needs already installed?
The OP should open up the receptacle and see whats inside and report back.
He may just have to rearrange the wires in the panel and install the needed/correct receptacle behind the range.

I had this happen not all the long ago.
Aaaaaand what would I be looking for when I take off the receptacle cover?
 

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@jmg32 first, let's start with providing us the info for the new item you wish to purchase. You say it calls for 240 volts, but how many amps does it call for? And does this appliance require a neutral? If you don't know, you could even provide the product page for it for us to find ourselves.

It is possible to change the receptacle and some wiring around to make it work, but there are several variables to take into account.
First would be the amperage of the current circuit, either 15 or 20 amps and the wiring size and type.
Next would be the amperage of the new appliance, and if it needs a neutral or not. If it needs a neutral, there is a 99% this will not work.
If the amperage will work on the existing wiring, we can move onto the next problem.
Next would be to determine how many receptacles are on the current circuit you wish to convert to 240. If it's a dedicated circuit with only the 1 receptacle, this is perfect. If there are like 10 other receptacles on the circuit, this is a bad idea, as you'll loose use of those receptacles for normal items. If this is the case, I'd suggest a new dedicated circuit.

If the wiring is too small for the new appliance, new circuit.
If the circuit will support the new appliance but has several receptacles on said circuit, install a new circuit.
If the wiring is the right size (and type), and has no other receptacles, then its probably possible.

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
@jmg32 first, let's start with providing us the info for the new item you wish to purchase. You say it calls for 240 volts, but how many amps does it call for? And does this appliance require a neutral? If you don't know, you could even provide the product page for it for us to find ourselves.

It is possible to change the receptacle and some wiring around to make it work, but there are several variables to take into account.
First would be the amperage of the current circuit, either 15 or 20 amps and the wiring size and type.
Next would be the amperage of the new appliance, and if it needs a neutral or not. If it needs a neutral, there is a 99% this will not work.
If the amperage will work on the existing wiring, we can move onto the next problem.
Next would be to determine how many receptacles are on the current circuit you wish to convert to 240. If it's a dedicated circuit with only the 1 receptacle, this is perfect. If there are like 10 other receptacles on the circuit, this is a bad idea, as you'll loose use of those receptacles for normal items. If this is the case, I'd suggest a new dedicated circuit.

If the wiring is too small for the new appliance, new circuit.
If the circuit will support the new appliance but has several receptacles on said circuit, install a new circuit.
If the wiring is the right size (and type), and has no other receptacles, then its probably possible.

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
Something like this:

https://www.lowes.com/pd/GE-Profile...Cooktop-Common-30-in-Actual-29-75-in/50425906

GE provided this answer to a question on the Lowe's site: The recommended circuit breaker is 40 Amps. You must use a two-wire, three conductor 208/240 VAC, 60 Hertz electrical system. A white (neutral) wire is not needed for this unit. The cooktop must be installed in a circuit that does not exceed 125 VAC nominal to ground.

I went and checked my breaker box and it does appear that all the kitchen outlets are on the same circuit. The breaker for the kitchen outlets (#28) is a 2-pole 30 amp breaker and shares it with the dryer outlet (#30). The dryer outlet is, of course, 240.

Don't know if any of this is helpful
 

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The breaker for the kitchen outlets (#28) is a 2-pole breaker and shares it with the dryer outlet (#30).
Either you are miss reading something or your wiring is screwed up.

Slots 28 and 30 are a 2pole circuit. Because it is 30 amp, it should be the dryer circuit. Nothing else should be on that circuit.

It would be a code violation to put a 120v receptacle circuit on that breaker.

While you might possible use a similar 2 pole breaker to provide 120v to the kitchen (2 120v circuits sharing a common neutral, called a MWBC) it should be a 20 amp breaker, not 30 amp.

If not a MWBC, you should have at least 2 single pole breakers providing power to kitchen receptacles.

Turn that 30 amp breaker off. Then go check for power at the kitchen receptacles.
 
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