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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have small garage door we would like to convert to a man door.
This side of the house is brick. I would like to finish in brick to look better.
Garage door is a stantard small door about 8 ft tall and 8 or 9 ft wide.
What im i looking at cost having brick layer to the brick work and leaving me the door to tackle.
 

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retired framer
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We have small garage door we would like to convert to a man door.
This side of the house is brick. I would like to finish in brick to look better.
Garage door is a stantard small door about 8 ft tall and 8 or 9 ft wide.
What im i looking at cost having brick layer to the brick work and leaving me the door to tackle.
Is the wall all brick or wood with brick in front of it like siding?
 

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Please post a picture of what your dealing with so we can see what your seeing.
There is no way anyone is going to be able to anything but guess on pricing, you need to get at least 3 local prices for that.
Just some factors to consider:
It will be near impossable to get a perfect match on the bricks unless this is a newer house.
Some of the old bricks will need to be cut out and removed so they can weave in the new bricks, which takes a lot of time to do.
https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/...e6ece798b7dc6a09eb1142ab69ea4e8d&action=click
That old apron may have to be removed so it does not cause water to get in under the wall.
The door threshold area may also have to raised, also to keep water out.
 
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A "Handy Husband"
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Often there is no footing under the garage door area and hence no support for the brick. I have done a few of these conversions using a wood framed wall and siding.

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I have never heard of a "man door". I have seen a manhole, they usually have a cover on them.

There is no way anyone on here can give you an estimate. Find someone in the Lexington area, or maybe Frankfort. You will be paying about 90% for labor and 10% for material. What you are really paying for is knowledge and experience, and a small price for the wear and tear on the tools. The price of a brick is about .80 cents each for a really good quality one, about .50 - .60 cents each for a low quality one from a box store. Do the math to get an estimate of the number of bricks needed for the type of brick that you currently have. That guesstimates out to about $500 for material give or take $100 (more of give). The labor will cost you approx $ 7000 to $9000. for about 3 days of work.

Those are only guesstimate numbers. I remember this from a long time ago.

I worked as an Electrician in Lexington while attending college. There are many building, apartments and houses in that area I help build. Even worked on the building of Gainsburough Horse Farm outside of Versailles.
 

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retired framer
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As mentioned, there is no foundation under the slab at the door, so connecting new to old would be a bit risky.

Water is another problem but can be solved.
Could you live with a wood structure with siding instead.
 

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Usually Confused
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As mentioned, trying to use brick to fill in the space will be tricky because of the weight. You might be farther ahead to find a siding that works for you. Since you said "a" small garage door, I assume you only want to replace one of the two shown. There is no way to mask the fact of what it is - a former garage door. I don't think I've seen a converted garage that didn't look like what it was; or rather, used to be. Are you planning to turn it into a living space? If so, other issues abound.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No on living space.
Yes just one door
Still be a garage.
Just trying not to have big opening in garage to keep humidity out.
All my ac ducts are now insulated but would sweat if door is open.
I understand the footing issue now.
I did not think of the weight.
Just trying to make it look like it wasnt a garage door but like some one else posted it will still look like a garage door conversion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
No on living space.

All my ac ducts are now insulated but would sweat if door is open.
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AC ducts should be boxed insulated and drywall, and not open to the garage.
Older home.
I assume did not have centrel air when built installed after.
The finished part of basement is drywall around main and all other lines.
Basement garage was round 8 inch circle pipes of main going to different rooms above.
I removed installed insulated round pipe new floor registers.
Insulated main line.
 

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retired framer
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Older home.
I assume did not have centrel air when built installed after.
The finished part of basement is drywall around main and all other lines.
Basement garage was round 8 inch circle pipes of main going to different rooms above.
I removed installed insulated round pipe new floor registers.
Insulated main line.
The ceiling of the garage should have 5/8 fire rated drywall taped and filled including HVAC, That is for fire safety and auto off gas safety. that would be a better place to spend the money and time and would be cheaper.
 
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