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And what size wire? Amperage of existing circuit? We gotta a pesky small wire rule about remarking stuff under #4.
 

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Licensed electrician
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The old A/C circuit did not have a neutral which you will need for the 120 circuit.
 

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Licensed electrician
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ok,ive got two hot 220 and run it to a breaker box with two 30 amp breakers how do i wire it
You are missing a conductor to complete the 120 circuit. 120 circuits need a neutral.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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The short answer is you can't.

You do not have a neutral for the 2 hot leads.

Receptacles and lighting circuits are limited to a max of 20 amps.

You may be able to convert to 1 120 volt circuit if you replaced the breaker with a single pole 20 amp.

You really need to explain better on what you have existing and what you are trying to accomplish (how you will use the 2 new circuits you want).
 

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I=E/R
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how to make two 110 outlets from one 220
Let's take a new look at this.
A 120 volt circuit needs a Hot, a Neutral, and a ground. Some 240 volt circuits can be converted quite easily if the right wire is feeding the old circuit. Can you tell us about the existing wire? What color is the insulation and how many wires?
 

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Cruising into the sunset
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iam trying to convert one 220 to two 110 lines 0
on two 30amp breakers how do i wire it
First make sure you have two hots, one neutral and either conduit and metal boxes or a dedicated ground wire from the panel to the existing 220v receptacle. If you do not have that, you cannot create two separate circuits.

If you do have that - remove the two pole 30 amp breaker, install two single pole breakers (do not exceed 20 amps if you are feeding a receptacle and typically not over 15 amps if you are feeding lights). The neutral can be shared between the circuits, one hot would then go to each load (motor, receptacle, light, etc.) Make sure all loads are properly grounded. If this is an outside receptacle, make sure it's a GFCI rated the same as the breaker.

If you don't have three wires and a ground, just the two hots and a ground, you can create only one single pole circuit by making one of the hot wires your neutral. I'd suggest you wrap white tape at each end over the conductor you decide to make the neutral. Use a continuity tester, with all wires unconnected, to identify the new neutral at either end.

If you have conduit, you can pull in a neutral and follow the first scenario. If you can't get a fish tape through the conduit, you can use one of the conductors as a pull wire or remove all the wiring and pull in the fish tape with it, then pull in the old wires with a neutral.
 

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Cruising into the sunset
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He also said:
iam trying to convert one 220 to two 110 lines 0
on two 30amp breakers how do i wire it
Outlets? Lines? On 30A breakers?

I think we need to know exactly what he's trying to do, other than create 120v circuits. bobcatoo2, what is this for? Motors? Receptacles? Dedicated devices? What do you plan on feeding?
 

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He also said:

Outlets? Lines? On 30A breakers?

I think we need to know exactly what he's trying to do, other than create 120v circuits. bobcatoo2, what is this for? Motors? Receptacles? Dedicated devices? What do you plan on feeding?
At this point I think the guy needs an electrician.
 

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You can convert the 10 or 12 gauge wire circuit to a single 120 volt 20 amp circuit (20 amp breaker) ending in a duplex receptacle provided that the two feed wires are white and black. You may not remark a colored wire of size 6 or smaller to be a neutral, using white tape.
 
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