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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a CSST (flex line) LNG line running through my deck for my gas grill (was there when we bought the house several years ago, has been working fine). We are in the middle of having the deck rebuilt and they had to disconnect the line in order to run it through the new deck boards. I turned the gas on and it is clearly leaking (bubbles and smell). I tried snugging it up more (was already pretty tight) and that didn't help so I disconnected it and took some pictures. I want to make sure that I'm not missing a gasket or o-ring or something, or maybe this is one of those one-time-use type compression fittings and I need to run out and get a replacement. Here are the pictures:




 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You may have to re-do flex line fitting. You may have severed the flex line by over-tightening it. It looks bent. Just a thought.

Hope you get in figured out and fixed soon clawlan.

Thanks for the feedback. I found the fitting online and it appears to be metal-to-metal so no missing gasket. But it very well may have been over-tightened. If I replace the fitting, I replace not just the nut, but also this outlined section too?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is it leaking there? It didn't look like it in the pic. Looked like the bubbles were on the flex side. I agree, it wouldn't hurt to just replace everything. Fittings are cheap.

Yes it's leaking out the back of the nut on the flex side, but that nut connects to that circled fitting. I assume you replace the whole fitting, not just the nut.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are CSST fittings brand agnostic? I'm looking at them on Home Depot's website and they are HOME-FLEX brand and the description says "Use with only HOME-FLEX or Alpha-Flex CSST gas systems". Lowes sell Pro-Flex which appears to be a better fitting but it also refers to Pro-Flex CSST. The brand in my home appears to be Gastite.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
OK, upon further research, CSST fittings are supposedly NOT brand interchangeable. I'm starting to sweat a bit now that I've learned how the Gastite fitting works. The split bushing goes around the first corrugation and guides the flex line as the nut pushes and deforms/flattens the end of the line against the inside of the fitting,essentially flattening that first corrugation. Here is a video:

So now that it has been taken apart, its never going to seat perfectly again. Ideally I just cut away some of the line, exposing a fresh edge but I don't have any slack. I see two options:

1. Put the split bushing back another corrugation, thus allowing more of the line's end to deform and flatten as the nut tightens. I might have barely enough slack to accommodate this but it's not using the fitting as designed.

2. Swap out the iron coupling for a longer one, thus allowing me to have enough slack to cut away some of the flex line to expose a fresh edge. If longer couplings don't exist, I can just add more iron pipe and another coupling effectively lengthening it all that way.
 

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2. Swap out the iron coupling for a longer one, thus allowing me to have enough slack to cut away some of the flex line to expose a fresh edge. If longer couplings don't exist, I can just add more iron pipe and another coupling effectively lengthening it all that way.
I would bet that the fittings are probably OK and option #2 is what needs to be done.

Here is a little something that you might want to think about before proceeding any further though. Gastite (and other brands of CSST) can be very susceptible to rupture in the case of a nearby lightning strike. At the very least, please make sure it is properly bonded/grounded as per the manufacturer's instructions, in case the original installer might not have done it.

I would further recommend that for liability purposes, you might want to consider paying a certified Gastite installer to do the re-connection. It might also be a good idea to find out from the city if the original grill installation was permitted, and if it wasn't to pay for the proper permit and to make sure that gas line gets inspected.

I say this so that if lightning were to strike nearby and cause the gas line to rupture, your insurance company wouldn't have an easy reason to deny the claim. Think of the extra money spent for a contractor and the permit as being kind of like an extra insurance payment for your insurance.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would bet that the fittings are probably OK and option #2 is what needs to be done.

Here is a little something that you might want to think about before proceeding any further though. Gastite (and other brands of CSST) can be very susceptible to rupture in the case of a nearby lightning strike. At the very least, please make sure it is properly bonded/grounded as per the manufacturer's instructions, in case the original installer might not have done it.

I would further recommend that for liability purposes, you might want to consider paying a certified Gastite installer to do the re-connection. It might also be a good idea to find out from the city if the original grill installation was permitted, and if it wasn't to pay for the proper permit and to make sure that gas line gets inspected.

I say this so that if lightning were to strike nearby and cause the gas line to rupture, your insurance company wouldn't have an easy reason to deny the claim. Think of the extra money spent for a contractor and the permit as being kind of like an extra insurance payment for your insurance.

Good luck!
Thanks for the details. Yes, I am very aware of the risks associated with CSST. Since my basement is completely finished, there is no way for me to ensure that everything was correctly bonded without tearing out walls. A year back we were considering tankless water heater and the plumbers said they weren't comfortable working with our CSST because they couldn't verify that it was installed and bonded correctly, and they spent a lot of time educating me of the possible safety issues.

I do know that code allows it to be installed outside with correct strapping; it just cannot be buried or touch the ground. Attachment to outdoor appliances is also allowed provided you use the appropriate exterior appliance connector and hose which is what I have.

And just because I haven't enough stress already, the only shut-off before this fitting is before the manifold in the house. So I have to shut off gas to the entire house until I get this taken care of.
 

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Now, would also be a good time to add a shut off closer to that appliance as well to eliminate that worry in the future, like the oven.

Each gas appliance should have a separate shut off close by. If you have a certified pro do it, he would make it code compliant.

Can't really tell you what to do, if you diy the liability lies with you the owner, if anything should go wrong. As mentioned, a certified gas fitter, qualified with csst may be the may to go so you are off the hook. Just a suggestion.

Hope everything works out for you clawlan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Now, would also be a good time to add a shut off closer to that appliance as well to eliminate that worry in the future, like the oven.

Each gas appliance should have a separate shut off close by. If you have a certified pro do it, he would make it code compliant.

Can't really tell you what to do, if you diy the liability lies with you the owner, if anything should go wrong. As mentioned, a certified gas fitter, qualified with csst may be the may to go so you are off the hook. Just a suggestion.

Hope everything works out for you clawlan.
Thanks again. Got it all taken care of this morning by extending the black iron and cutting the csst to reveal fresh edge. There is a shut-off valve, it's just downstream of that connection, at the grill.
 

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Since my basement is completely finished, there is no way for me to ensure that everything was correctly bonded without tearing out walls.

The bonding should be done near the beginning of the CSST, probably at the manifold in your house that you speak of. It shouldn't be concealed inside of the walls or ceiling. Therefore, it should be easy for you to figure out if it's done or not, and it should be easy for you to correct it if it's not.

They recently eased the requirements for how this needs to be done, which might make things easier for you. It used to be that the ground wire from the CSST needed to be run to a ground lug inside of the electrical panel or directly to a grounding rod. Now it says that you can use basically any reliable ground inside of the building, such as a metal water pipe.

Basically you attach a clamp either around the brass CSST nut or to the steel gas piping before the CSST, and another clamp around some nearby metal water piping. Then you run a length of 6 gauge wire between these 2 clamps and you're done.

If you don't have metal water piping or if your electric panel is close by, you can also run the wire to inside of the panel to one of it's ground lugs or to it's own ground rod that's pounded into the ground.
 
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