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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Howdy from West Texas,

In a previous post I sought advice on how to correct a situation where my former contractor didn’t use treated lumber for sill plates on detached work shop project. Sent him packing after unacceptable work and other things. Paid 1/3 at start up to cover majority of materials, 1/3 at completion of framing, and was going to pay the last 1/3 upon completion. There were issues with the concrete, framing, using drywall screws on hurricane ties and also to secure roof OSB sheathing, 2x6 scraps pieced together for barge rafters and rakes, and materials that were supposed to have been purchased new that were obviously weathered and came from who knows where. Caught the guy in several untruths, finally had enough.

I’m 65, retired from State of Texas DSHS and had a liver transplant eight months ago after being diagnosed with liver cancer. I’m in no way back to full throttle, but I’ve been able to fix some of this guy’s “work” with the help of my wife, son, and some great neighbors. I just don’t understand how somebody can sleep at night knowing they were paid as agreed upon in good faith, did crappy work, and took advantage of us. We’re out 2/3 of the total cost, and are left with trying to fix what he left, and get green lights from the City on it.

Concrete Before - More Ridges and Waves Than Slop Bucket
Automotive tire Road surface Asphalt Grey Tar
Road surface Asphalt Grey Tar Pattern

Concrete After 6 Hours Grinding
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tire Wheel Asphalt
Asphalt Grey Road surface Tar Concrete

Before w/ Drywall Screws
Wood Wood stain Flooring Hardwood Plank

After w/ The Right Fasteners-19
Wood Wood stain Floor Flooring Hardwood

Subfacia and Barge Rafter Pieced Together
Just One Of Many
Sky Light Line Wood Slope

Doing It The Right Way
Sky Wood Shade Beam Material property

Siding From Hell Brought By Contractor - Was Paid For New LP Smart Siding
Brown Font Wood Beige Art
Brown Nature Wood Branch Trunk
 

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Sorry for all the disappointments.
Lot of incompetent people out there with their own money management problems trying to be contractors.
I personally like to pick and buy the material. Then I know what I an getting.
In Texas, I believe if the contractor doesn't pay for the material used on your home, the supplier can put a lien on your house. So you want to make sure the material was paid for.
Unfortunately, I believe you won't be able to recover your money.
Now you can be in control. Get good references from friends who have had success with laborer who can assist you to complete the job. You can do this.
Best wishes.
 

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Big Dog
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That really sucks.

Sadly, the industry has its share of incompetent and unscrupulous operators. Some think just because they know how to hold a hammer, they can call themselves a contractor. Others bank on the homeowners ignorance and pad their profit by using inferior products or taking short cuts that result in sub-standard finish.

Unfortunately homeowners have few options, pay someone else to fix the issues and/or take the contractor to court. Both cost money.

Before hiring any contractor, do your homework.

1. Familiarize yourself with the project. You do not have to become an expert but at least know what the project will involve.

2. Get at least three comprehensive bids. Be sure the companies are licensed in your state, bonded, insured and able to provide verifiable references. The bids should include all materials to be used including brands and reasonable estimation of time to complete. It should also detail who is responsible for removal of any waste material.

3. Immediately dismiss any potential contractor who pushes you to sign on the spot.

4. During the project, frequently check on the progress and do not be afraid to question anything. Reputable contractors will be proud to explain why things are done a certain way.

5. Never give the contractor a deposit of more than half the agreed cost and never make a final payment until the work is completed to the agreed upon standard.
 

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#1 Rely on referral from friends who had successful experience with contractor. Observe the contractors previous work. Make sure they really did the job they are claiming was their job not someone else's job even when they show you progress pics of the job
 
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