DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have installed a deep well at a pond on my property. The well will supply supplemental water to the pond via a hydrant, and it will also service a geothermal water-water heat pump 300ft away at my home. I need to be able to (continuous) run the well independent of the heat pump (cannot run hydrant/heat pump at the same time), so the plan is to turn off the geo heat pump and only run the hydrant water to the pond when needed. Plan is to install a contactor in the well pump's control box connected to a on/off switch for the hydrant; the heat pump control panel will also be connected to the same contactor to turn on the well pump when it calls for water (hydrant switch OFF). Everything is 240 volt. I have attached a rough drawing of the configuration along with a pic of the contactor. All of the necessary wiring is in place, I just need help on all the connections.
 

Attachments

·
flipping slumlord
Joined
·
5,116 Posts
I have installed a deep well at a pond on my property.
The well will supply supplemental water to the pond via a hydrant,
and it will also service a geothermal water-water heat pump
Don't you have all that backward?

You have an engineered geothermal HVAC system with a deep well.
Can that well and the water available be adapted to other purposes?
I'd suspect not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It is called an Open Loop "Pump and Dump" geothermal water-water heat pump system. Water is taken from a deep well, circulated into the heat pump, and then discharged into the pond - all perfectly legal. The discharged water from the heat pump is the exact same water that entered it from the well, no chemical changes at all. My desire is to use the well to service both the pond's hydrant and the geo heat pump, and I need switching to do that.
 

·
flipping slumlord
Joined
·
5,116 Posts
It is called an Open Loop "Pump and Dump" ...

Water is taken from a deep well, circulated into the heat pump...
My desire is to use the well to service both the pond's hydrant

... and I need switching to do that.
You need a TEE and valve to do that.
Maybe a solenoid valve (if you want need to be all fancy about it).


How frequently is this bypass operation needed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are you talking a plumbing TEE ?? If so that's already been done 6ft below ground at the well casing. There is a TEE to the heat pump water line and a TEE to the hydrant. I don't foresee using the bypass a whole lot once the pond is full - primarily using the hydrant to keep ahead of pond evaporation in late summer.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
4,080 Posts
Just a line diagram showing the piping from the well/pond/geo would probably help also. As to me, I am seeing a on/off switch for a hydrant and do not see what kind of electrical control is opening/closing the hydrant.

What is this "hydrant", a electric solenoid on a 1/2" - 1 inch pipe that is dropped over in to the pond ?

As to me, utilizing a contactor with "auxillary" contacts on it, may work out well in this control system. And even maybe a float mounted to a pipe driven in the pond to replenish the pond water. Without depending on ones presence or memory..to turn a ON/OFF hydrant switch to replenish it with water.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,184 Posts
There must be a contactor in the geo system to turn on the pump. Look into a switch that runs the geo system in normal position and turns off the geo but turns on the pump in the other position.
Without seeing the geo system control wiring no way say what exactly is needed or if it might not be possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think there may be some confusion about the hydrant. It is a plumbing connection, not electrical. It has a handle to manually turn off and on. It is the pipe with the red handle in the photo. I need to isolate the Heat Pump and use a switch to turn on the well pump to send water to the hydrant.

 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,184 Posts
I need to isolate the Heat Pump
There is the tricky part. The contactor needs to disable the heat pump.

It looks like the 12/2 is the switch line to turn on the pump.
The simple solution is a switch across the 12/2 line. Turn it on and the 12/2 shorts and runs the pump. However this does not stop the heat pump starting while in this mode.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
No, I don't think you are way off and have grasped the concept. A couple points..
- I see it is 240v the whole way through, which I think it needs to be, to include a 240v coil in the contactor. The issue might be to get the 24v HP control board to send a 240v signal down the line.
- My thinking was to turn off the HP at the thermostat...shut it down, then switch the well pump on continuous flow to the hydrant at the well control board location. Does your diagram do that...or might the HP keep calling for well water?
I'm working on another diagram that I'd appreciate your thoughts on.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
4,080 Posts
No, I don't think you are way off and have grasped the concept. A couple points..
- I see it is 240v the whole way through, which I think it needs to be, to include a 240v coil in the contactor. The issue might be to get the 24v HP control board to send a 240v signal down the line.
- My thinking was to turn off the HP at the thermostat...shut it down, then switch the well pump on continuous flow to the hydrant at the well control board location. Does your diagram do that...or might the HP keep calling for well water?
I'm working on another diagram that I'd appreciate your thoughts on.
Sorry, I was working with what your OP sketch had drawn out, which to me did not show any LV controls in the well pumps control box for the HP geo- water loop demand. I just read the well control box as having all 240 volt wiring it in.

The blue text reads to me now, like you are making what you are wanting to accomplish ...way too involved. When we design our home's projects we need to keep in mind that just what if, one day we get hurt/sick and are out of commission for a while.

Will we have someone at home to be able to operate our "handiwork" correctly for us, to keep our homes essential systems working ? Just food for thought.

Good Luck on your project.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top