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Discussion Starter #1
I'm switching from an electric cooktop to a gas cooktop. The one I'm installing is used but in great shape. The cabinet is stubbed in for gas (see photos). Could it possibly be as simple as this?

(1) Remove the cap from the rigid gas line.
(2) Thread the nut from the from the stove's flex line onto it.
(3) Turn the yellow valve on the rigid line to the "on" position
(4) Plug the stove in so there's power to the fan and ignition.
(5) Start cooking.

If it's this easy, do I need teflon tape or any type of gasket or O-ring like you might find in a garden hose/nozzle connection?

How do I check for gas leaks when done so I know I'm not going to blow the joint up?

Thank you!
Rufus
 

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I'm switching from an electric cooktop to a gas cooktop. The one I'm installing is used but in great shape. The cabinet is stubbed in for gas (see photos). Could it possibly be as simple as this?

(1) Remove the cap from the rigid gas line.
(2) Thread the nut from the from the stove's flex line onto it.
(3) Turn the yellow valve on the rigid line to the "on" position
(4) Plug the stove in so there's power to the fan and ignition.
(5) Start cooking.

If it's this easy, do I need teflon tape or any type of gasket or O-ring like you might find in a garden hose/nozzle connection?

How do I check for gas leaks when done so I know I'm not going to blow the joint up?

Thank you!
Rufus
Almost that easy. Take the yellow line to the hardware store, tell the man / lady what size black pipe is coming from the floor that is capped and they will fix you up with a brass flare fitting to pipe adapter. While there buy a roll of 1/2" Teflon tape to put on the black pipe threads ( 3 or 4 wraps clockwise ) but not on the flare fitting threads.

Open the valve momentarily to blow any debris out, close the valve and make the connections. Enjoy your new stove.
 

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#1 HAWKEYE FAN
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maybe its just me but I prefer to use pipe dope on gas fittings. Check for leaks by mixing dish soap in a small amount of water, make lots of bubbles and check the connections.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys. Dumb question...do i need some kind of special pipe wrench to remove that cap from the iron pipe, or will a good pair of channel locks do the trick?
 

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Channel locks may work but are not my choice of plumbing tools. If I were doing it I would use 2 pipe wrenches. The reason for the second is for backup on the nipple that's screwed into the top of the valve to keep it from turning. If it turns and breaks the seal I go ahead and remove it and re-make it if pipe thread dope was used. Without a backup there is a possibility the valve itself can turn breaking the lower seal. That's the big advantage of Teflon tape in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The cap came off easy with channel locks. The male thread on the iron pipe is pretty gunked up. Any tips on cleaning? Steel wool maybe? Can't really get a wire brush in that tight space.
 

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The cap came off easy with channel locks. The male thread on the iron pipe is pretty gunked up. Any tips on cleaning? Steel wool maybe? Can't really get a wire brush in that tight space.
If the thread dope is still soft don't worry about it. Steel wool I wouldn't recommend. Keep the inside free of debris and for safety don't leave the pipe open any longer than necessary.
 
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