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I have a Square D panel. It has two bars where neutral wires can be connected. Does it matter which connection bar to use for given neutral wire coming into the panel?

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No, just keep the grounds and neutral wire sepperate.
 
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A Square D panel has the bars bonded together.
 
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One of the things I've learned from this site is that Jim is right lol. Also, I have never seen a d^2 panel that had two neutral bars that weren't bonded together. I have seen two bars, one for grounding conductors and one for neutrals, that weren't bonded together as they shouldn't be in a sub panel. This is the main so all your "ground wires" (umbrella term intentional) can land on either bar.
 

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If you ever upgrade electrical and turn this into a subpanel then you don't have to rewire all of them.

Also it's prettier.

Technically there may also be a de minimis safety advantage, but it's so tiny as to be irrelevant. (If neutrals are altogether and someone absurdly brushes their hand across them while they are energized, they won't get a shock, whereas if they are mixed with the grounds and there is a ground fault, they might... )
 

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If you ever upgrade electrical and turn this into a subpanel then you don't have to rewire all of them.
The chances of this are so slim I hardly think it's worth the bother.

Also it's prettier.
I fully disagree. Having wires crossing back and forth across the top of the panel is not what I'd call pretty.

Also, when you are doing this for a job there is no reason AT ALL to waste your time doing this in a main panel. Just do a neat job and get paid.

To each his own.

At the same time Joe makes it seem like it is required or important. It is not.
 
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Maybe he meant to say, was to not put a ground and Neutral under the same screw like a lot of old timers did
Now that is a possibility. An odd way to put it, but a valid point.
 

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I prefer to install a ground bar then a bonding jumper if it is the main panel . ( This must be done if it is a sub-panel . )

Then put all the earth grounds on the ground bar and the neutrals on the neutral bar .

Strictly , not required by code , but is required by our largest customer . So we pretty much make it SOP .

But I realize , it is not the only way it can be done .

God bless
Wyr
 

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I prefer to install a ground bar then a bonding jumper if it is the main panel . ( This must be done if it is a sub-panel . )

Then put all the equipment grounds and any earth grounds on the ground bar and the neutrals on the neutral bar .
Corrected it for you.
 
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Please explain what your understanding is , of earth ground .

I think I have explained my understanding .

I freely admit , I do not think the term earth ground appears in NEC .

Thanks ,
Wyr
God bless
 

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Yes .

They also end up being connected / bonded , eventually to the grounding electrode conductors . And also the service neutral .

The grounding electrode conductors are each connected / bonded to a source of earth ground . ( water pipe , rebar , structural steel , made electrode , etc. )

God bless
Wyr
 

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I don't know why the term "earth ground" bugs me so much. I think it's because ground means earth so I feel like you're saying "earth earth" or "ground ground."
Calling something a ground wire is too vague of a description to be a useful term since all wires in a house are connected to the earth at some point.
 

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Yes .

They also end up being connected / bonded , eventually to the grounding electrode conductors . And also the service neutral .

The grounding electrode conductors are each connected / bonded to a source of earth ground . ( water pipe , rebar , structural steel , made electrode , etc. )

God bless
Wyr
So, what is your point?
 

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Yes .

They also end up being connected / bonded , eventually to the grounding electrode conductors . And also the service neutral .

The grounding electrode conductors are each connected / bonded to a source of earth ground . ( water pipe , rebar , structural steel , made electrode , etc. )

God bless
Wyr
You are correct, but being connected to the earth isn't the important feature of equipment grounding conductors. The most important aspect of equipment grounding is being connected to the neutral through the Main Bonding Jumper, which is what allows faults to be cleared. As long as the MBJ is connected, you could disconnect the earth ground and the system would still be "grounded" in the most important sense.
 
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