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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon, I want to assemble a panel of lights of different colors for the lighting of my living room :smile:.

The only thing I know of electricity is that: there are different cables for different resistors for different voltages according to use.

I have the idea of order of LED lights in a square aluminum board, but more than that I do not know. Also I want to connect the maximum number of LED lights possible without overloading the three drivers.

I currently have 3 types of LED lights: white, red and blue. The technical detail of these is as follows:

List of my leds with electrical technical details::vs_bulb:
  • 50 (quantity) x 3w (watts) cold white / 3.2-3.8v 700ma
  • 50 x 3w red / 2.2-2.4v 750ma
  • 50 x 3w blue 445-455nm / 3.6-3.8v 700ma

Also I have::vs_bulb:
  • 150 x pcb stars of aluminum
  • 3 x 50 watts drivers INPUT AC: 85/265v50/60hz AC: 0.8A OUTPUT DC: 24-38V DC: 1.5a+-5% 10C*5&*1W

:smile:I hope someone will agree to help me. In this case immediately I attach a sketch image of order that would LEDs on aluminum board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I attached the sketch with its lights below.
How connect resistors between the lights or how to do to connect all the three drivers? or Connect what lights with what lights? etc.. etc.. I hope you can help me. thanks.
 

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What is your level of knowledge ?
Do you understand polarity,series connections,
Parrallel connections, voltage drop, current flow ?
With that many Leds there will be quite a bit of wiring,
But it is all basic stuff, but because there is lots of wires
it may appear complex
are you up to the challenge ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What is your level of knowledge ?
Do you understand polarity,series connections,
Parrallel connections, voltage drop, current flow ?
With that many Leds there will be quite a bit of wiring,
But it is all basic stuff, but because there is lots of wires
it may appear complex
are you up to the challenge ?
I know basics of electricity (polarity, in serie or parallel connections).
Voltage drop and current flow I do not understand it well.

I know welding cables, connecting've done tests led to cell phone chargers but LED lighting is minimal, etc. It is the experience that I have, and I'm ready to do this, I just need the technical support of the connections, different resistors, wires and type of parallel or serial (the most convenient) connection.
 

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There are commercially available LED light strips that are just peel and stick. They come with power supplies and controllers.

That will be far more effective than trying to solder and insulate a bunch of loose LEDs.
 

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Good afternoon, I want to assemble a panel of lights of different col

I currently have 3 types of LED lights: white, red and blue. The technical detail of these is as follows:

List of my leds with electrical technical details::vs_bulb:
  • 50 (quantity) x 3w (watts) cold white / 3.2-3.8v 700ma
  • 50 x 3w red / 2.2-2.4v 750ma
  • 50 x 3w blue 445-455nm / 3.6-3.8v 700ma

Also I have::vs_bulb:
  • 150 x pcb stars of aluminum
  • 3 x 50 watts drivers INPUT AC: 85/265v50/60hz AC: 0.8A OUTPUT DC: 24-38V DC: 1.5a+-5% 10C*5&*1W
It does not matter where you live, nor the "mains supply of your country".
However, you do need to have an appropriate DC power supply, capable of supplying the Voltage and Current which you require.

You need only to know concerning each and every LED, the Voltage drop across it and the MAXIMUM current allowable through it.

You will note that the Voltage drop across the LEDs concerned are
White 3.2 - 3.8
Red 2.2 - 2.4
Blue 3.6 - 3.8

Now, you also state that the 50 each of White and Blue can "absorb" 700 ma while the 50 Red may "absorb" 750 ma.
Of course, this MUST be in a parallel connection of any such set of LEDS. Averaging this out across the 50 LEDs in each case, you should see that each LED would be conducting 14 to 15 ma.
If you work this out, you will find that this is quite conservative, in that most small LEDs are "rated" to operate up to 20 ma.

So, going on from there you should appreciate that it is possible to supply these LEDs in several ways.
To take just one case: if you supply 50 Red LEDs (with an individual voltage across each of 2.4 V) you will require at least 50 * 2.4 V = 120 V DC
You could place them in series across 120 V DC BUT they would almost certainly draw too much current and expire.
However, if you calculate 50 * 2.2 V = 110 V
with a 120 V DC supply you need to "drop" 10 V at 15 ma you would need to have 10V/0.015A = about 680 Ohms as an in series "dropping" resistor (which would need to dissipate much less than 1 W).

The 50 Blue LEDs (all in series) would need to be supplied with 180 V, etc.

It all "boils down" to the fact that you don't do it "en mass".

You determine a reasonable power supply voltage and "operate" the LEDs concerned in a set-up of series and parallel "strings" which suit the Voltage and the maximum Current of the supply, and "limit" the current in each string to less than the maximum possible (Say 15 ma)

For instance, if you operate all LEDs in series groups of 10, the maximum voltage drop across any such string will be 38 V (for a "Blue" series "string" of 10.)
If you have a power supply which will deliver 48 V DC, you would need to drop 10 V at (say) 15 ma - which is (again) 680 Ohms - for EACH of such series "strings".

So on, with other values, for each of any such other series "strings".

For these calculations, the least that you need to know is
R= E/I
I = E/R
E = I * R
W = E * I
W = (I * I) * R
W = (E * E) / R

(Where
E = Volts
I = Amps
R = Resistance (Ohms)
W = Watts)
 

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Now, you also state that the 50 each of White and Blue can "absorb" 700 ma while the 50 Red may "absorb" 750 ma.
Of course, this MUST be in a parallel connection of any such set of LEDS. Averaging this out across the 50 LEDs in each case, you should see that each LED would be conducting 14 to 15 ma.
If you work this out, you will find that this is quite conservative, in that most small LEDs are "rated" to operate up to 20 ma.
No, I believe you are misreading the specs he posted. These are 3W high power LEDs, and he has 50 of each. They operate at 700-750mA. They CANNOT be placed in parallel without using current balancing resistors, and that's discouraged by the manufacturers because they still don't share current well unless you use excessively large balancing resistors and trim them in the field. Good design practice requires that high power LEDs are operated in series. This is why LED drivers are specified for common LED current ratings, but higher voltages. They are used in series strings, with no resistors required.

The LED driver the poster has is not a match for any of these LEDs. That's a 1500mA driver, intended for the next generation of high power LEDs which can handle that much current. The 700mA LEDs require a 700mA max driver. Several drivers will be required, and they need to be dimmable if the poster wants to be able to adjust the color and brightness of this array.
 

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No, I believe you are misreading the specs he posted. These are 3W high power LEDs, and he has 50 of each.
Wow.

Indeed, it appears that I have "misread"
Mea Culpa.

"he has 50 of each" - off three "Colours"!

It appears that he is trying to install 450W of White, Red and Blue LED lighting in a "Living Room"

Again WOW!
 

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Yeah, I think it will be bright enough.
 
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