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Connect British plug for blow dryer?

727 Views 10 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  seharper
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I want to wire a British plug end on a blow dryer. (Not planning any trips right now of course, it's for future use.) The dryer has 2 wires, the plug takes 2 wires, but does it matter which wire goes to which screw?

Photos are of the plug I want to wire, and a standard British plug.

Thanks!

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If the blow dryer is intended for use in Great Britain, it will have the plug in your picture. Their common residential voltage in Great Britain is 230 Volts at 50 Cycles. I'll bet your blow dryer is 120 Volts at 60 cycles (Hz).

For your own safety, buy the correct adapter/convertor or buy a blow dryer when you get there. That's why the plugs are different.
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If the blow dryer is intended for use in Great Britain, it will have the plug in your picture. Their common residential voltage in Great Britain is 230 Volts at 50 Cycles. I'll bet your blow dryer is 120 Volts at 60 cycles (Hz).

For your own safety, buy the correct adapter/convertor or buy a blow dryer when you get there. That's why the plugs are different.
Thanks, my blow dryer is dual voltage; I set it to the 240 notch.

Blow dryers in British stores run $50 and up, and they're mostly bigger than the compact dual voltage that I've got. That's the reason for my question.
All the dual voyage hair dryer come with adapter plugs. Did you lose them?

Sent from my RCT6A03W13E using Tapatalk
All the dual voyage hair dryer come with adapter plugs. Did you lose them?

Sent from my RCT6A03W13E using Tapatalk
No, my dual voltage never had one. It's about 10 years old so maybe they weren't doing that then.

I do have a multi-purpose Europe adapter that would work, but I'd use that for USB charger for phone/tablet/camera.
Since your dryer is dual voltage you only need a plug adaptor, not a power adaptor. Amazon US has them listed at $6.50 for a set of two.
Thanks for the replies everyone. :thumbup1: I'm all set.

I am curious, though, about my original question -- would it have mattered which wire went to which post? I assume this also applies to putting a new end on a U.S. electrical device, like a lamp, which I'd like to do.
Thanks for the replies everyone. :thumbup1: I'm all set.

I am curious, though, about my original question -- would it have mattered which wire went to which post? I assume this also applies to putting a new end on a U.S. electrical device, like a lamp, which I'd like to do.

Their neutral goes to the left-hand pin (looking at the face of the plug-ground on top) but I don't think the pins are different like ours now are.


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quote - I am curious, though, about my original question -- would it have mattered which wire went to which post ? I assume this also applies to putting a new end on a U.S. electrical device, like a lamp, which I'd like to do.



If the appliance is double insulated ,then it will not matter, and the appliance will work.


The only time it matters is if the appliance has grounded area's such as a washer or dryer.
Be careful with an adaptor. A hair dryer is a relatively high power appliance. Seems like most are in the 1000-1500 watt range. the Cheaper adapters, especially the universal adapters, have very thin conductors inside. I've seen them heat up and start smoking when used with high-draw items. You best bet is to get an adapter which is *only* designed to adapt whatever plug is on your hair dryer to the UK outlet.
quote - I am curious, though, about my original question -- would it have mattered which wire went to which post ? I assume this also applies to putting a new end on a U.S. electrical device, like a lamp, which I'd like to do.
Yes, line and neutral are different wires. You think "they're AC, how can it matter?" The answer is the way the system is bonded. AC power systems are almost isolated. The two wires are 120V apart, but they both could be thousands of volts from ground. That would be bad... so there is a Neutral-Ground Equipotential Bond which forces one of the wires to be near ground voltage. Therefore the other is only 120V from ground. The chosen wire is declared to be Neutral, and is considered the "safer" conductor.

Thus, we now care about polarity on AC. US plugs have a taller neutral. UK plugs are all polarized by nature since they are all 3-prong.

The color codes for neutral are white or gray (US), black (old UK), blue (new UK and EU), and on a lamp cord of one color, it is the ribbed side.
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