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I would doubt that most manufacturers would swap a unit for fin damage. I would suspect that this would make virtually no difference in the performance of the unit, and you could fix it with a fin comb. I've seen several warranty statements that specifically exclude manufacturing defects of the coil/fin assembly.
 

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Did you buy the extended labor warranty. The standard factory warranty is part only, no labor or accessory items included.
 
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When they manufacture the coil they install the aluminum fins on the tube. This looks like where they started a new aluminum strip.
If the system is operating ok i would not worry about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
leak

When they manufacture the coil they install the aluminum fins on the tube. This looks like where they started a new aluminum strip.
If the system is operating ok i would not worry about it.
i have leak some where a/c people cant seem 2 find there quessing thats it
 

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i have leak some where a/c people cant seem 2 find there quessing thats it
A good company would use a trace amount of R22, and then bring the pressure up with nitrogen and find the leak.

The manufacturer's warranty is for part only, not labor or any refrigerant, driers, etc. So I sure would want to know where its leaking before spending money to replace a coil that probably isn't leaking. And then get a bill fro m them if the warranty is denied.
 
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MOST of the time when a cond coil leaks it leaves behind a large oily spot so they should see it on the coil if that is it. I have seen lots of fins like that and none of the coils leak. VERY rare that a cond coil leaks. Most of the time it is the welded joints outside or the evap coil inside. I have had to use nitrogen and bring it up to 150 psi B4 a tiny leak on a cold weld on a service valve fitting showed up and I had to STARE at it for several minutes to see the bubbles. Would not bubble at 125 psi and you think it should. Takes years of frustration and experience to be a good leak finder.
 

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If you still have some pressure in the system you can try spraying that are with bubbles. But yuri is right, if there is going to be a leak on the condensing coil it will be at the metal sheet where the u bends are. If you want to find that leak pressurize to 300lbs.
 

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MOST of the time when a cond coil leaks it leaves behind a large oily spot so they should see it on the coil if that is it. I have seen lots of fins like that and none of the coils leak. VERY rare that a cond coil leaks. Most of the time it is the welded joints outside or the evap coil inside. I have had to use nitrogen and bring it up to 150 psi B4 a tiny leak on a cold weld on a service valve fitting showed up and I had to STARE at it for several minutes to see the bubbles. Would not bubble at 125 psi and you think it should. Takes years of frustration and experience to be a good leak finder.
I'm more an automotive AC guy but my Tifco electronic detector seems to work very well for even those tiny leaks. Some automakers put fluorescent dye in the refrigerant oil from the factory (nissan), which makes the job easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
what can a reg.joe do if not licenced to get freo n ? can i but nitrogen? can i close valves and put in pressure coil with air tank? the lines are cut and brazed closed about 6 inches from service valves i should be able to try something with out paying with no results
 

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Not much you can DIY. There are special procedures to leak test units. Cannot use air as it is a non condensible gas and will introduce moisture into the system and create acid and other problems. I would suggest a better service company and as mentioned there is a dye kit (dye) which can be added to the lines. Unit is then run for a day and they come back and use a "black light" to see if they can find the leak. The better more experienced techs know how to do that procedure and have high quality electronic leak detectors. The rest don't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Not much you can DIY. There are special procedures to leak test units. Cannot use air as it is a non condensible gas and will introduce moisture into the system and create acid and other problems. I would suggest a better service company and as mentioned there is a dye kit (dye) which can be added to the lines. Unit is then run for a day and they come back and use a "black light" to see if they can find the leak. The better more experienced techs know how to do that procedure and have high quality electronic leak detectors. The rest don't.
would they do it as a service charge here their about 69 to 89 bucks
 

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You can't legally get R22.

Air should never be used to pressurize lines that have had oil running through them, as it can cause an explosion, as oil and oxygen are not friendly with each other.

While nitrogen can be used to pressure test the lines. You will also need a regulator for the nitrogen tank. As the tank will have 2,000 PSIG of pressure in it.
 

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would they do it as a service charge here their about 69 to 89 bucks

The good dye is expensive, and using the HI black light is an additional charge. A good company, isn't gonna be cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You can't legally get R22.

Air should never be used to pressurize lines that have had oil running through them, as it can cause an explosion, as oil and oxygen are not friendly with each other.

While nitrogen can be used to pressure test the lines. You will also need a regulator for the nitrogen tank. As the tank will have 2,000 PSIG of pressure in it.
can i buy nitro?
 

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Yes you can. In some areas you have to also buy the tank, others you just pay the deposit on it. But you will still need to buy the 160 to 200 dollar regulator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The good dye is expensive, and using the HI black light is an additional charge. A good company, isn't gonna be cheap.
what is a service charge just to drive out or to do what and what does a 15 point season check up do i got 1 year guy came out hooked up and checked freon and left
 

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And a 200 dollar set of refrigeration gauges and hoses to get it in the system. If you are not careful the nitrogen can overpressure the hoses and blow up in your face. A 1500-2000 psi nitrogen tank is not to be fooled around with.
 

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what is a service charge just to drive out or to do what and what does a 15 point season check up do i got 1 year guy came out hooked up and checked freon and left
A service charge includes just about nothing. It doesn't cover doing any work. Specially not leak checking.

Different companies put different things in their system check, but lots of techs don't do 80% of what is on the list. Some because they are lazy, others because the company doesn't charge enough, and has them scheduled to do 6 or 8 PM checks a day.
 

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The 15 point checkup is like that on a car. They check the BASIC points, freon level coil cleanliness etc etc for under $200 and is usually done by a junior tech who is not totally experienced or reached Journeyman status. Just like you don't get a Journeyman mechanic doing oil changes on a car. We train them to call us if they spot something wrong or out of the ordinary. The el cheapo companies like Beenthere said don't do much or pay enough in wages to attract any skilled techs.
 
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