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Hi,

I noticed there is always wetness on the ground and side of the house. I'm assuming it is due to condensation from the HVAC lines that is existing from the unit that is in the attic.

Do you think it is just condensation dripping? How do I fix this? Can I just spray Great Stuff around the area?

Thanks
 

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Check the black insulated line ( suction line ) on the left for cracks. It looks dried up and probably cracked and may have bare spots further down.

Point is when it is open to the atmosphere it sweats and may need to be replaced. UV rays and time deteriorate it. Most local HVAC shops can sell you a piece.

It has a size to fit over the size of line. Kinda looks like you have a 5/8" suction line. Take a piece of it off and measure the inside hole diameter. There is also 3/4" and you can use it also. Costs a wee bit more $$.

The part at the house you can spray foam.

Google : AC pipe insulation and you can buy it online also.
 

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That spread pattern of the water points right to where the refer lines connect to the high side. You should investigate that to see if the compressor dome is sweating or even frosting when the unit has been running for a while.

The condensing unit looks pretty new and may have been replaced while using the existing evaporator. (I'm guessing-may be wrong) If so, that could lead to a low superheat that can cause excessive refrigerant to flood back to the compressor. That can damage the compressor if allowed to go for a long time.

Check it out and call a service tech if you aren't sure. A small wet spot on the compressor dome isn't a real problem but if the entire dome is wet, the superheat should be corrected. Could also be caused by a clogged evaporator or some other air flow problem at the furnace.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
That spread pattern of the water points right to where the refer lines connect to the high side. You should investigate that to see if the compressor dome is sweating or even frosting when the unit has been running for a while.

The condensing unit looks pretty new and may have been replaced while using the existing evaporator. (I'm guessing-may be wrong) If so, that could lead to a low superheat that can cause excessive refrigerant to flood back to the compressor. That can damage the compressor if allowed to go for a long time.

Check it out and call a service tech if you aren't sure. A small wet spot on the compressor dome isn't a real problem but if the entire dome is wet, the superheat should be corrected. Could also be caused by a clogged evaporator or some other air flow problem at the furnace.
Bought/moved into the house Oct 2019. I was built Feb 2015, so I don't think any parts of it has been replaced.

Since you mentioned the furnace, there is also a pooling of water right below the furnace that is in the attic. I'm not sure if the furnace water dripping and the outside dripping are correlated or isolated problems.

Any thoughts?
 

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You have a condensing furnace, meaning the furnace produces water when it runs.
Looks like you have a leak and/or a clogged drain.
 

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There may have been some overflow activity but more likely that mess is from the coil flooding back refrigerant and not from a plugged drain. It may require you to get a service tech out to determine what's going on. Maybe blow back through the drain from the bottom where it dumps near the condensing unit below to clear the drain if it's plugged or just for a test. Looks like the coil is flooding back too much and may have an air flow problem or the wrong orifice installed to match the compressor size. Needs a tech to check. Could be an air flow issue from a coil that needs cleaning or a clogged filter... other air restrictions possible. Maybe wrong speed of blower... lots of possibilities for a competent tech to check out.

Should have a cleanout/vent in the primary drain to blow through but wouldn't be effective unless the furnace stack tie in and primary pan drain were temporarily plugged to stop the backflow. Usually just easier to disconnect it.
 

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You have a cold refrigerant line and a cool condensate line next to what looks like a dryer vent. Perfect scenario for condensation.
 

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I see you're installing an alarm... good idea.

Adding to my post above... The system may also be overcharged with refrigerant and creating that flood back condition.. You get very poor performance/efficiency that way.

Needs the suction line insulated properly at the attic location.
 

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I'd start with the easy things rather than jump to complication. That would be a lot of water for condensation on the line set.

Start with the duct-taped little tube in the condensate line. Water spilling out then possibly the pad is sloped towards the opposite corner.

Water dripping down the siding. See if its just the elbow leaking, if not cut out the foam and see if it's coming down from inside.

Adding foam does not stop water, it just fills holes.
 

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