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Discussion Starter #21
No they don’t not. At the most, the corner of one room on the gable expirences some condensation but I figured I was kind of “bleeding” in a little farther then the rest of the areas.
This tells us there is cold air leaking into the ventilated eaves area where it shouldn't be. That's where the correction needs to take place. What exactly is wrong there, we have no way of knowing at the present time.



The contractors are so smart to say there wasn't a problem during warm weather from April - September or possibly they were never in the house during that time frame. Well woopiee, we can see they don't have a clue.
So would you agree that installing rigid board, sealed in with caulk/spray foam would prevent that from happening?
 

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That's a lot of condensation. Like really a lot. I'd look to see if it's just condensation forming on your ceiling or if it's a combination of that and other moisture dripping down.
It's possible that the roof isn't venting at the ridge which could cause condensation to form on the underside of the roof sheathing which would run down to the eaves where it's dripping in at the ceiling to wall joint. Check that you have some kind of vent in place and functioning. Either a ridge vent, gable vent, or those turtle looking thingies (technical term!).
I'd also poke my head up into the attic and see if it's generally damp feeling or shows signs of moisture accumulation.
Now, under normal circumstances the wall to roof junction is a weak spot in the thermal envelope. Look at a triangle and see how little space there is at the corner? That's your roof-wall intersection. Now, if you had a lazy insulator who didn't want to crawl into that narrow corner you might not have much insulation and what's there could have big gaps that are letting warm air up from downstairs mix with the cold air coming in the soffit vent creating condensation. Tighten up that intersection so the incoming cold air from the soffit vent is just hitting the underside of the roof sheathing and the insulation is keeping your ceiling warm so it's not a condensing surface. Fill any air leaks from the living space to the attic. It can be a tricky detail and a lot of builders didn't really pay much attention to it back in the day.
 

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retired framer
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I haven't read all the info here but you should have an air chute against the roof sheeting to allow air from the soffit into the attic and some bat material to block the rest of the hole so loose insulation does not fall into the soffit or gets wind blown away from the outside wall.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I haven't read all the info here but you should have an air chute against the roof sheeting to allow air from the soffit into the attic and some bat material to block the rest of the hole so loose insulation does not fall into the soffit or gets wind blown away from the outside wall.
Yeah I’m going to install rigid foam board instead of using fiberglass insulation as a plug underneath the baffle vents. Fiberglass plugs (from what Ive read) don’t seem to stop air from passing through.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
That's a lot of condensation. Like really a lot. I'd look to see if it's just condensation forming on your ceiling or if it's a combination of that and other moisture dripping down.
It's possible that the roof isn't venting at the ridge which could cause condensation to form on the underside of the roof sheathing which would run down to the eaves where it's dripping in at the ceiling to wall joint. Check that you have some kind of vent in place and functioning. Either a ridge vent, gable vent, or those turtle looking thingies (technical term!).
I'd also poke my head up into the attic and see if it's generally damp feeling or shows signs of moisture accumulation.
Now, under normal circumstances the wall to roof junction is a weak spot in the thermal envelope. Look at a triangle and see how little space there is at the corner? That's your roof-wall intersection. Now, if you had a lazy insulator who didn't want to crawl into that narrow corner you might not have much insulation and what's there could have big gaps that are letting warm air up from downstairs mix with the cold air coming in the soffit vent creating condensation. Tighten up that intersection so the incoming cold air from the soffit vent is just hitting the underside of the roof sheathing and the insulation is keeping your ceiling warm so it's not a condensing surface. Fill any air leaks from the living space to the attic. It can be a tricky detail and a lot of builders didn't really pay much attention to it back in the day.
Thanks for the tip! I’ll look into the ridge vent a little more. Should I be seeing some light coming through? Because i don’t see any.
 

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retired framer
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Yeah I’m going to install rigid foam board instead of using fiberglass insulation as a plug underneath the baffle vents. Fiberglass plugs (from what Ive read) don’t seem to stop air from passing through.
bats are the standard here for the last 30 years but what ever works.
Air takes the easy route and that is what the chute is for.
 

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ok, everyone has told you about the insulation, I am going to ask you one thing, and your going have to take a piece of your wall out. your have to check if the home is sealed from the outside. for that you have to go inside. That's what a contractor would first check. there is something every home must have and that is a moisture seal.
 

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ok, everyone has told you about the insulation, I am going to ask you one thing, and your going have to take a piece of your wall out. your have to check if the home is sealed from the outside. for that you have to go inside. That's what a contractor would first check. there is something every home must have and that is a moisture seal.
Hi James, we don't want to say moisture seal, as in a plastic vapor barrier as all homes need to be able to dry in at least one direction. The op is in a cold climate so if a vapor barrier were to be installed it would be between the drywall and the framing. But the latest thinking is only extreme climates need anything beyond the interior paint. At most a vapor retarder. Air sealing is the new "must" to control the movement of moisture.

Feel free to clarify if I misread.

Bud
 
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