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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi. I am thinking of making a concrete patio for my new cottage, but I'm wondering if the extreme winters of Quebec will damage it in the future. Will controlled joints be enough to prevent cracking?
 

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retired framer
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Hi. Is it fine to make a concrete patio in the cold climate of Quebec? Any pros and cons? Advice against it? Thanks for any help.
Check with the ready mix people at what Temp they would not deliver concrete for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Check with the ready mix people at what Temp they would not deliver concrete for that.
Hi Neal. What I meant to ask is if it will be durable during freezing winters. Will controlled joints be enough?
 

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retired framer
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Hi Neal. What I meant to ask is if it will be durable during freezing winters. Will controlled joints be enough?
You don't do it in freezing temps and you need to keep it warm for a time like over night if it will freeze at night.
 

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The first thing to consider is if the ground is frozen. You don’t want to place concrete on a frozen surface. Heating blankets can be used to get rid of frost but at great expense. If the ground is not frozen and temps will be a few degrees below freezing the heat of hydration of the concrete will keep it warm. You could have 1 or 2 percent accelerator put in the concrete to make it heat and cure faster. After it is cast and finished it should be covered with blankets to keep it warm. In weather colder than a few degrees below freezing the area can be enclosed and heated with a salamander. Concrete is possible in any weather but the price goes up exponentially as the temperature drops.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The first thing to consider is if the ground is frozen. You don’t want to place concrete on a frozen surface. Heating blankets can be used to get rid of frost but at great expense. If the ground is not frozen and temps will be a few degrees below freezing the heat of hydration of the concrete will keep it warm. You could have 1 or 2 percent accelerator put in the concrete to make it heat and cure faster. After it is cast and finished it should be covered with blankets to keep it warm. In weather colder than a few degrees below freezing the area can be enclosed and heated with a salamander. Concrete is possible in any weather but the price goes up exponentially as the temperature drops.
I think my question isn't that clear sorry. I won't be building it in the winter, I am just wondering if the cold winters in the future will cause any damage to it, otherwise I'll go with a wood deck.
 

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Hi. I am thinking of making a concrete patio for my new cottage, but I'm wondering if the extreme winters of Quebec will damage it in the future. Will controlled joints be enough to prevent cracking?
Most likely. Companies adjust their mix for the area it is being used.
I would be more concerned with it heaving and moving around with the frost than the slab cracking.
How the ground is prepared prior to the pour is the key to a good concrete slab.
 

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retired framer
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I think my question isn't that clear sorry. I won't be building it in the winter, I am just wondering if the cold winters in the future will cause any damage to it, otherwise I'll go with a wood deck.
Frost heave would be the problem with a slab. The prep below is important and and how dry the soil is below down to frost .
 

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There are concrete slabs all over Quebec that is what they will look like after years of winter’s ,look at others. Quality of product and installation play a big part in the way the concrete will perform for years ground prep forms and of course control joints


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Air entrainment is extremely important in cold climate concrete, as well as surface density. Excessive bleed water, weak mixes, poor finishing practices might squeak by in the South, but not in extremely cold climates.

If you're especially concerned about frost heave, you can pour over foam insulation to lessen the potential heave. We only use 25 psi foam under concrete.
 
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