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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to pour concrete for a sidewalk along one side of the house. There is a good slope along that side of the house but I'd prefer not to use a lot of steps as I frequently have to wheel materials down or up the slope.

How are forms built and concrete poured to go down a curving slope? I guess this would be along the lines of how a driveway is poured going down a slope.
 

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We use Masonite for any radius. It can be pleasingly bent and reverse bent (French Curves), although it DOES require a few more stakes and good dirt backing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
5.5' rise over a 33' run (6-1). Although the rise is not consistent over the entire distance.

Okay, so a curved form is built so it can be screeded and troweled like normal.
 

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I would like to pour concrete for a sidewalk along one side of the house. There is a good slope along that side of the house but I'd prefer not to use a lot of steps as I frequently have to wheel materials down or up the slope.

How are forms built and concrete poured to go down a curving slope? I guess this would be along the lines of how a driveway is poured going down a slope.
Couple things:

1. Check with the town, there might be maximum slopes at play. I did a sidewalk job at a private school and it took an act of god to get a 1:10 slope to be accepted, and it wasn't even an ADA walk.

2. Plan your pour. Where is the truck going to deliver it from? Hopefully from the top. If the truck is going to make the delivery at the base, god bless the people running your wheel barrows.

3. When you order the concrete, tell them what you have in mind, and tell them you want a mix with as low a slump rating as you can get. Don't get snookered. Sometimes they'll do a half truck delivery first, and then come to your smaller delivery to try and get rid of what's left and sneak 2 deliveries in one load, so to speak (especially for a pour like yours with less then 2 yards). Problem with that is that it comes from the yard stiff (low slump), and they'll add water at the first delivery, making it looser so it moves quicker. If they come to you and pour a loose load, you're screwed unless you specifically asked for a stiff mix. Ask for a slump of 3.0, that will get their attention.

4. As stated, masonite is great for twisting the forms. Just overlap the joints so they don't pinch too bad. I have a twisting walk in front of my front steps, and that's how I did it. But my slope was a pretty tame 1:18, 90 degree arc with R=11'. Came out nice.
 
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