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I'm building a shed and I made a post in another forum with lots of questions - figure it makes more sense to specialize the topics :)

Shed Floor - I've done a lot of searching - can't find anything definitive on how high above grade. Slab with be 5 1/2" thick or so (might as well - 5 yards costs the same to deliver as 3 yards with a short load fee). I'm in Utah, and we get a decent amount of snow. I'm considered putting it 3" above grade, is that enough/good?

Also, anyone have advice on the size of pad vs the shed? Meaning, exactly the same size? 6" bigger? 12" bigger?
 

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Concider building it using stem wall constrution, not just a slab.
Google "stem wall"
3" is not even close enough to being high enough off the ground, the siding needs to be a min. of 6" off the grade and the sheathing needs to be run at least 1" below the slab.

The slab should be the same size or slightly smaller then the bottom plate outline. The sheathing needs to be able to cover the slab to wall area by a small amount to keep out insects, critters and rain.

No one has ever built a shed to big, instead of wasting the concrete like that just make the shed bigger and pore it the normal 4" thick.
 

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You know, I looked for hours on recommendations of how high above grade and the size of the shed to build. Shortly after reading your post earlier I found this website: http://www.atlanticshed.com/expage/slabinfo.html

Basically its the exact same point you're saying, to overlap the concrete by 1". In the diagram it shows the slab being 4" above grade, which I can do. You mention 6" though. Why so high?

As for your comment to make the shed bigger - 240 sq ft is the max size allowed without a permit. Stem wall seems to be some major overkill for this job, but I'll consider it some more.
 

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The image you linked says 5" from surface of slab to grade and a 2" overlap for the siding.

You will need the bottom edge of the siding up from grade to help avoid water getting into/under the siding at the bottom. What siding do you intend to use?

You mentioned snow. I think Joes stem wall suggestion is a good idea for that environment.
 

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Take the time to look around on this site and any other DIY site and check out all the pictures of peoples homes where the floors and siding are rotted out from being installed to close to grade.
There's been dozens of post over the years of garages and sheds that have rotted siding, sheathing, outside corner trim, bottoms if the studs, bottom plates rotted to the point there not holding any thing up.
All caused from it be built to close to the slab or grade.
 

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You need to do a stem wall or a turned down edge on your slab to get below the frost line. If you don't you're going to have problems in the long run.
 

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I'm building a shed and I made a post in another forum with lots of questions - figure it makes more sense to specialize the topics :)

Shed Floor - I've done a lot of searching - can't find anything definitive on how high above grade. Slab with be 5 1/2" thick or so (might as well - 5 yards costs the same to deliver as 3 yards with a short load fee). I'm in Utah, and we get a decent amount of snow. I'm considered putting it 3" above grade, is that enough/good?

Also, anyone have advice on the size of pad vs the shed? Meaning, exactly the same size? 6" bigger? 12" bigger?

Why not pour a 4 inch thick slab,with a 6 inch high by 4 inch wide curb around 3 sides and the the front less the door opening.
 
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