DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

Concrete Footing with Wood

872 Views 28 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  Racinmason
I have a footing under a window that I need to pour. It looks like the previous owners used wood frames to pour concrete, but they left a rectangular hole behind. I took out the wood frames that were on top, but there's another layer of wood underneath. It runs around three sides of the hole. The wood is stuck tightly in the concrete and partially buried, and I don't think I will be able to get it out. Is there a problem with just pouring the concrete over the top of everything? Or is this something I need to take care of before pouring concrete?
Water Fluid Wood Tints and shades Rectangle
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

· Naildriver
Joined
·
23,302 Posts
If you are sure it is wood, and not concrete that has taken the appearance of wood that was against it, then yes it needs to be removed. It will only cause problems once it starts to rot.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think I see another layer of wood below. Just install some rebar pins and pour it.

Curious though, why was it made?
I'm not sure why it was made. I've dug down and there's no second layer of wood, just the three pieces left lining the hole. I could cut them out, but it would take a while and I was just wondering if it was necessary. From the first comment it sounds like I'm better off just removing them and pouring after.

I haven't really done concrete work before; do I just drive the rebar pins into the dirt until they are just below floor level, then pour?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,973 Posts
I'm not sure why it was made. I've dug down and there's no second layer of wood, just the three pieces left lining the hole. I could cut them out, but it would take a while and I was just wondering if it was necessary. From the first comment it sounds like I'm better off just removing them and pouring after.

I haven't really done concrete work before; do I just drive the rebar pins into the dirt until they are just below floor level, then pour?
No, you drill some 5/8 holes with a roto-hammer and epoxy some 1/2 inch (#4) rebar into the holes.

Inside form boards are very hard to remove.

If you did nothing it would probably still be ok (probably)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I have a footing under a window that I need to pour. It looks like the previous owners used wood frames Kodi nox to pour concrete, but they left a rectangular hole behind. I took out the wood frames that were on top, but there's another layer of wood underneath. It runs around three sides of the hole. The wood is stuck tightly in the concrete and partially buried, and I don't think I will be able to get it out. Is there a problem with just pouring the concrete over the top of everything? Or is this something I need to take care of before pouring concrete? View attachment 720977
if there is wood it has to be removed
 

· Registered
Joined
·
937 Posts
If that lower section is gravel, a sawzall would cut those sections out, if not, a little more knowledge of the sawzall would help, and a pry bar, they should come out. Will eventually rot.
 

· retired framer
Joined
·
70,304 Posts
I used to have about 5 of these. Any inside forming box was just a whole lot of fun!
We always get it out too, but many foundations we build on are installed by others, and when we get there the gravel is inside and we don't see what they have left behind like that.
Before that gravel is in the exterior drain, some plumbing and waterproofing is done and inspected.
If the inspectors don't catch it or care about it, I am not digging down to find it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,973 Posts
We always get it out too, but many foundations we build on are installed by others, and when we get there the gravel is inside and we don't see what they have left behind like that.
Before that gravel is in the exterior drain, some plumbing and waterproofing is done and inspected.
If the inspectors don't catch it or care about it, I am not digging down to find it.
Agreed, and I'm not sure about the Frasier river valley but Seattle doesn't have to many problem bugs.

Might be a problem for the OP though.

Wood wedges, sawzall and big pry bars. Oh, also towels for wiping the sweat off your face.
 

· retired framer
Joined
·
70,304 Posts
Agreed, and I'm not sure about the Frasier river valley but Seattle doesn't have to many problem bugs.

Might be a problem for the OP though.

Wood wedges, sawzall and big pry bars. Oh, also towels for wiping the sweat off your face.
Lack of thought when building the forms, if you learn to fight the fight to get them out then you figure how to build things so they will come out.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top