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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I now leaning toward installing Aeratis decking on the front porch instead of mahogany. Ironstone Bldg. Materials has what I'm looking for. Can I go ahead and use my conventional floor nailer or will I have to use hidden fasteners? The sales person at Ironstone said that a floor nailer would work.
 

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Got a website so we can see what your talking about?
If there pressure treated joist where are you going to find Stainless Steel or Ceramic coated fastners so they do not rust out in a year being in contact with copper treated wood?
Any install questions really need to be run through the company that made the decking if you expect any type of warranty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Got a website so we can see what your talking about?
If there pressure treated joist where are you going to find Stainless Steel or Ceramic coated fastners so they do not rust out in a year being in contact with copper treated wood?
Any install questions really need to be run through the company that made the decking if you expect any type of warranty.
These joists are at least 95 years old. I have not torn the entire old porch off. Just done a 'preliminary inspection' by pulling up a few boards. Things look pretty good. Stainless steel fasteners are not recommended for coastal areas. I live in Lancaster, PA. My question remains: can I go ahead an use a conventional flooring nailer?
 

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Stainless steel fasteners are not recommended for coastal areas.
Not sure where you came up with that. Stainless steel fasteners are the 'best' choice in a coastal (salt) environment.

My question remains: can I go ahead an use a conventional flooring nailer?
Well, I don't have a yes or no for you (I didn't look it up). Just look at the manufactures installation specs and don't deviate from them if you want to keep any warranty in place. http://www.aeratis.com/installation-instructions-2/
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not sure where you came up with that. Stainless steel fasteners are the 'best' choice in a coastal (salt) environment.

Well, I don't have a yes or no for you (I didn't look it up). Just look at the manufactures installation specs and don't deviate from them if you want to keep any warranty in place. http://www.aeratis.com/installation-instructions-2/
Link very helpful although the instruction 'manual' sounds like it was written by someone from the Far East. "If you are using a pneumatic nailer, it is best practice to us a joist adhesive such as Titebond (Heavy Duty Construction Adhesive)."

So it appears that a conventional pneumatic nailer can be used. The part about applying construction adhesive to the joists is a head scratcher...:vs_worry:

Then there is this warning: ". (NEVER leave the protective film exposed to light and UV longer than 24 hours. The film can potentially cause some
discoloration. For prolonged exposer to UV and moisture if stored outside improperly. If you are going to have the boards stored
outside, turn the top row of boards over to have the protective film face downward.)" What's up with that? Shouldn't the material be relatively immune to UV exposure in the first place?
 

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Just guessing but floor nailers use spikes that could split the porch joists. Old houses with t&g subflooring has a lot of split wood. It may not be time saver. It also uses more force which is supposed to butt the flooring tight to eachother. I don't know if your material is tight joint or spaced, but it feels like floor nailer is not the tool for outdoor decking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just guessing but floor nailers use spikes that could split the porch joists. Old houses with t&g subflooring has a lot of split wood. It may not be time saver. It also uses more force which is supposed to butt the flooring tight to eachother. I don't know if your material is tight joint or spaced, but it feels like floor nailer is not the tool for outdoor decking.
Something to consider. Thanks.
 
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