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IF YOU'RE LIKE US, WE DID NOT WANT TO INSTALL PRESSURE TREATED DECK BOARDS ON OUR NEW DECK PROJECT. AFTER RESEARCHING COMPOSITE DECK BOARDS, WE SELECTED RHINO DECK BOARDS. THEY LOOK GREAT AND ACTUALLY FEEL BETTER ON THE FEET THAN OTHERS. THEN WE CLEANED IT FOR THE FIRST TIME - WOW!!!!!!!!!

USING A MR CLEAN NON-BLEACH HOUSEHOLD CLEANER WITH JUST A GARDEN HOUSE - NOT A PRESSURE WASHER - WE WERE BLOWN AWAY AT HOW MUCH IT FADED. IN CONTACTING THE COMPANY, THEY SAID (AND I QUOTE)
There is no sign of product failure here.


PLEASE BEWARE - IF YOU ARE CONSIDERING COMPOSITE DECK BOARDS, DO NOT CONSIDER RHINO.... WE ARE SOOOO DISAPPOINTED!!!!!!!!!!
 

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IF YOU'RE LIKE US, WE DID NOT WANT TO INSTALL PRESSURE TREATED DECK BOARDS ON OUR NEW DECK PROJECT. AFTER RESEARCHING COMPOSITE DECK BOARDS, WE SELECTED RHINO DECK BOARDS. THEY LOOK GREAT AND ACTUALLY FEEL BETTER ON THE FEET THAN OTHERS. THEN WE CLEANED IT FOR THE FIRST TIME - WOW!!!!!!!!!

USING A MR CLEAN NON-BLEACH HOUSEHOLD CLEANER WITH JUST A GARDEN HOUSE - NOT A PRESSURE WASHER - WE WERE BLOWN AWAY AT HOW MUCH IT FADED. IN CONTACTING THE COMPANY, THEY SAID (AND I QUOTE)
There is no sign of product failure here.


PLEASE BEWARE - IF YOU ARE CONSIDERING COMPOSITE DECK BOARDS, DO NOT CONSIDER RHINO.... WE ARE SOOOO DISAPPOINTED!!!!!!!!!!
I do so love a whining post. Especially from a forum virgin.
Ron
 

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Hmmm...I have Rhino boards soon to be put down on my new front step. And I can't return them because I already cut them. My brother-in-law has 800 sq. feet of Rhino down, and though it scratches rather easily, he has noticed no fading in the year it's been exposed to the elements.

I chose to use composite as opposed to pressure treated because of the environmental impact -- PT leeches arsenic into the ground water, and composite (Rhino, anyway) is made from recycled plastic. Begs the question -- why were you using Mr. Clean on it? Would just water not work?

I'll let you know what I find once it's installed...

We use Pink Solution for all our cleaning -- perhaps a more natural cleaner would cause less fading?

Chris
http://handymansdream.blogspot.com -- follow along as the "Handyman's Dream" rises from the ashes!
 

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composite -----never

I chose to use composite as opposed to pressure treated because of the environmental impact -- PT leeches arsenic into the ground water, and composite (Rhino, anyway) is made from recycled plastic. Begs the question -- why were you using Mr. Clean on it? Would just water not work?

Chris

And plastic when it gets hot it emits DIOXION ---causes breast cancer, as well as other types of cancer.
 

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I guess as long as I'm using my composite decking to heat up my food, I should be okay.

http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl-microwave-dioxin2.htm

I do agree, however, that plastic is the devil in disguise. I don't microwave it, I don't store food in it. That said, there's a ton of it filling landfills. And this is one small way to reuse some of it.

Manufacturers don't recommend having your body coming in contact with PT lumber...
 

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Pt lumber

PT lumber has been around a long time and I dont know anyone who has been sick or is sick from it. I have been told that potato skins have arsnick in them too.

Seeing how you are willing to spend the money on composit have you though about cedar or redwood. Naturally insect and rot restant.

No matter what you use there is maintance to. Does not matterr what anyone says different.

I understand it is the in thing right now. I just dont see the bennift yet.

Less in the landfills-yes-But what else.

Anyway just the way I feel.

Goodluck with your project and post some pictures when you are finished.:thumbup:
 

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Yeah, not sure about the immediate effects of PT -- I'm more worried about ground water contamination. That said, fertilizing lawns is bad for groundwater, so is washing out paint brushes in your sink. Perhaps we are doomed. :)

I'll post pics when I get it done -- am a bit frustrated right now with planning -- my frame is built, but with composite, you have all these "ends" to worry about. The end of a deck board looks fine, but the end of composite seems to need some finishing....

Maybe another reason to go with cedar? :)

Chris
 

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Pressure treated does not have arsnic anymore. The new treatment process is called L3 and is more eco and people friendly. Rhino deck of the few we have sold have some issues and I'll leave it at that, It is now out of our product offerings.........
 

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Taken from the Simpson Strong Tie web site

Waterborne, Creosote, and Oil-borne (penta) are the three broad classes of preservatives typically used when pressure-treating wood.


Wood treated with waterborne preservatives is typically used in residential, commercial and industrial building structures. Creosote is primarily used for treating railroad ties, guardrail posts, and timbers used in marine structures. Oil-borne (penta) is most often used for treating utility poles and cross arms.

Several typical waterborne preservatives used in building applications include: Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA-C), Alkaline Copper Quat (ACQ-C, ACQ-D, ACQ-D Carbonate), Micronized Copper Quat (MCQ), Copper Azole (CBA-A & CA-B) and Sodium Borates (SBX/DOT).
These treatments are often referred to by trade names such as: Wolmanized Natural Select™ (Copper Azole), Preserve and NatureWood® (ACQ), MicroPro™, Smart Sense™ (MCQ), and Advance Guard® (Borate). Each preservative usually has a number of variations available so care should be exercised when specifying treated wood.

Some different oil-borne preservatives that are used are Chlorpyrifos/IBPC, Copper Naphthenate and Pentachlorphenol. One advantage of these treatments is that they do not create swelling in the wood, but there is generally an added cost over water-borne treatments as well as availability in some regions.


I believe this information is correct. For some perspective, note that this information is said to be current. Therefore, depending on the type of treatment, you could have a wide variety of chemicals in pressure treated wood, including pentachlorophenol (penta), napthalene, copper, chromium, arsenic, chreosote, boron, sodium, carbonate and other less well known substances. The only way to tell what is in your pressure treated wood is by checking the manufacturer's data sheet on the wood. Since all of these processes are apparently still in use, it is incorrect to state that arsenic is no longer used.

If you are concerned about chemicals leaching out of the wood into the groundwater, you can always use naturally durable wood without preservatives.
 
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