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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Disclaimer: although I do a lot of DIY stuff, this is not a DIY question, but I would really appreciate some inputs/advice.

I'm having a new house built. I told the builder a couple weeks ago that the ejector pit was placed in the wrong spot - directly underneath the main panel. I did a walk-through today and found that the pit hasn't been moved and instead, the basement has been poured and the main panel was just installed.

This seems to be a clear violation of common sense, and probably panel clearance codes. A quick search shows NSM 110-26(a) would apply. Can anyone confirm this? I live in Michigan / Van Buren county if it matters.

Now that the concrete floor is poured and since most of the electric hasn't been run yet, my instinct is that the builder should move the panel instead of the pit. Any thoughts?

Thanks,

-S
 

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Need to be contacting the local electrical building inspector, not a bunch of strangers on a website if you want action and real ansewers.
 
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I have the same situation in my home. Build a platform over the pit that will give safe access to the panel, is removable to access the pit and pump. Just make sure the discharge pipe is not in the space required by the NEC.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the quick replies. This gives me the info I need to talk to the builder on Monday.

I thought the ejector pump would be in the pit, and I'd end up with something looking like the attached pic. Perhaps the discharge pipe/pump will be in a different spot.

The top cover felt a bit flimsy to be rated to stand on, building a platform is a good idea anyways - not worth testing my girth vs that plastic.

-S
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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Thanks for the quick replies. This gives me the info I need to talk to the builder on Monday.

I thought the ejector pump would be in the pit, and I'd end up with something looking like the attached pic. Perhaps the discharge pipe/pump will be in a different spot.

The top cover felt a bit flimsy to be rated to stand on, building a platform is a good idea anyways - not worth testing my girth vs that plastic.

-S
That pup would be a violation....:wink::thumbup:
 

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You talking to me?
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Unless there is a couple pipes in the pit right now you will end up with something coming out of the lid of the pit. That is clearly a violation of the electrical codes. Either the plumbing has to be underground or either the pit or the panel moves.
 

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My take is that Contractor is not taking your concerns seriously. He doesn't get paid the last payment until it's fixed the way you told him to do it, or until you've gotten something in writing from the local code authority that it's okay. (Like an approval of a plan that notes where the ejector pump is).

Unless you have an amazing relationship with him or he's demonstrated amazing technical awareness. I've met great contractors who might have done this despite homeowner concern after talking to a local inspector, for example. Some might have done it after asking their electrician, but that's not going to help if the inspector disagrees, so if someone's done that you just have to be firm about getting it to pass inspection before the general gets paid everything.

He *may* be just trying to keep things moving, and changing the location would have taken X days and cost Y dollars. If that's the case fine, but he still has to fix it, and soon.
 

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I'd also be concerned with what looks like no pressure treated bottom plates, studs in direct contact with the walls, no vapor barrier or foam on the foundation walls before framing.
That outlet attached to the panel also should be GFI protected.
 

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Just make sure the discharge pipe is not in the space required by the NEC.
with what the picture shows, I'm not sure that is possible. There must be a 30" clear space extending 36" from the face of the panel. If there is 30", there isn't a lot more but if there is, it would mean the pipes would have to be routed so they allow for that 30" space and they would have to be under the standing space. I'm not sure it is possible in the situation shown.

but I want to know:

if that is a main panel, it has to be at least 100 amp service. Is there a conduit coming into the back of the panel not seen in the photo? That cable coming into the top doesn't look large enough for the appropriate service conductors.



but anyway, my vote is to move the panel as well. The sump being tucked into a small out of the way area such as we see seems to be a perfect placement so I would simply move the panel to another area.

and just in case the builder suggests it:

unless that area is 36" wide PLUS the depth of the panel and supporting backer (finished dimensions) , he cannot simply move it to an adjacent wall. You must have at least 36" clear space in front of a panel and it doesn't look like you would have that there.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the feedback, both about the original question as well as the side comments regarding vapor barriers, PT wood, etc.

There is a water barrier on the exterior foundation walls, which was applied after the forms were removed. There is also a barrier between the top of the foundation and the sill plates, but the basement framing barrier I didn't think to look for.

In terms of relationship with the builder, I'd say we're at "trust but verify". I'll go back to the site in the next day and follow up on the original issue and the others raised.

-S
 

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Discussion Starter #13
if that is a main panel, it has to be at least 100 amp service. Is there a conduit coming into the back of the panel not seen in the photo? That cable coming into the top doesn't look large enough for the appropriate service conductors.
Main service is 200 amp and comes in through conduit from the meter, and is fed in through the wall. I believe the cable out of the top is going to be for the air conditioning unit.

Completely agree about the sump location, its perfect except for being under the panel.
 

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Your money....your house....if the pit is not where the plan says it should be then move it! Or your not getting the next draw. Get your building inspector involved. He is there to protect you.
 

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The pit was there before the panel. Move one or the other. Do not put a vapor barrier between the concrete and the studs.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks again for all the feedback - y'all were a great help in sorting this out. After talking with the builder, construction stopped for a couple days while the builder talked with his subs. Then the panel moved and the pit stayed, which IMO is a good solution.

This issue could have been fixed for ~$100 before the floor was poured, but fixing it after the panel was up and partially wired made the rework more involved. The good news is that he seems more willing to listen when I bring up other issues, so the relationship goes on as "trust but verify".

Lastly, there was some comments/questions regarding the basement framing - the bottom plate lumber is pressure treated, and there is an air gap between the wall framing and the wall. Current plan is to leave the basement unfinished, so the framing is just going to hold insulation for Energy Star.
 
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