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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I think this is my first post, but I'll try to be clear.

I've been reading online and this forum to try to understand exactly what I need to do to complete my upcoming project.

Vital details

Would like to change the flooring of a carpeted 10'x11' room to bamboo
*Room is below grade, and I live in the pacific northwest (wet wet wet)
*Carpet is old and directly on a concrete slab (over a pad)
*I have already purchased the bamboo (may regret)
*There is MDF baseboard moulding around the room now
*I'm more time- than financially-constrained, but enjoy projects and would probably not do it rather than pay someone else (keeps me sane)

+ I was planning on floating it over a pad/vapor barrier
HOWEVER, I just read the manufacturers instructions and they explicitly say NOT to float flooring that is <5" width (the stuff I have is 3 7/8").

+ Regardless of installation method, I need an expansion gap around the edge. Should I remove the baseboard (how??) and then reinstall/patch/paint the moulding? Other option is stop shy of the moulding, then install quarter-round to cover the gap

Questions:
1) Do I get beat over the head verbally for going against the instructions and floating it anyway? Any idea why I'm not supposed to float it (assume structural rigidity of t&g joint)?
2) If I must glue it down, can you recommend specific products for me to both prep the surface (wet concrete) and glues for attaching?
3) What to do with baseboard/edges?
4) Any a priori tips on getting the tack strips off the concrete and scraping any fused pad?
 

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Already got a strikes againt the install with MDF trim and a wet basement.
MDF will soak up moisture like a sponge and mold up.
Vapor barrier and engineered flooring can be installed as a floating floor.
 

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Well then you can install it as a floating installation,as your under the 5" width,and take that MDF up before you install and replace it with real wood,take a look at this link.

The bamboo flooring material must be moved to the room where it will be installed for a period prior to the installation. This allows the flooring to adapt to the room's temperature and humidity. The material should be kept off concrete floors. If the room is ready for installation, and all materials and tools are present, one can expect to install about 200 square feet in a day.
There are three common ways for a bamboo floor installation: Naildown, gluedown and floating.
  1. NAILDOWN or SECRET NAILING: In this method, the bamboo floor is 'secretly' nailed down to a wood subfloor. It is the traditional way of bamboo floor installation using nails or staples. All solid flooring and many engineered floors can be installed this way.
  2. The floor joists (beam that supports a floor) must be marked to guide installation procedure. Also, the location of floor joists should be marked on the felt paper with chalk lines. These markings will identify where nails and staples should be driven to make a solid connection with the subfloor. The nails or staples are rammed at an angle through the tongue and are hidden by the next piece of flooring. This is why it is called 'blind or secret nailing.' Once starter rows are placed, the next planks should be nailed directly above the tongue at a 45- degree angle. A good eye should be kept on nail / staple penetration.
  3. GLUEDOWN: This method involves the gluing of the bamboo floor to a subfloor. A glue-down wood floor is installed in a similar way like that of flooring tile. It can be used for installation on both concrete subfloors and on plywood. Most engineered flooring and some solid flooring can be installed using the glue-down method.
    Bamboo flooring can be glued down using a moisture resistant flooring adhesive (especially urethane type). Water based adhesives should not be used for this purpose. After applying the adhesive to the subfloor with a trowel, the bamboo flooring planks should be immediately placed.
  4. FLOATING FLOOR: This involves gluing the tongue and groove joints of the bamboo flooring together over an underlay. A floating floor is attached to itself and not to the subfloor. It is installed over various types of cushion underlayment. This method is suitable for any subfloor and is especially recommended for radiant heat or below grade installations. Wider engineered or cross ply products should only be considered for floating.









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Discussion Starter #6
I appreciate the responses.

Joe - I don't know for a fact that the basement is wet, we just moved in a few months ago. The house is on a hill and the basement in back where the room is is at ground level. In the front, it'd be about 4-5 feet below grade. I also don't know that the trim is MDF (it's heavily painted), but it's just a rectangular profile and was redone about ~4 years ago (pergo upstairs - I'd be shocked if it was real wood)

I was definitely planning on a vapor barrier + pad

Canarywood - the instructions say NOT to float it is the width is less than 5 inches, which is what I have. Thanks for the other info, though
 

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+ I was planning on floating it over a pad/vapor barrier
HOWEVER, I just read the manufacturers instructions and they explicitly say NOT to float flooring that is <5" width (the stuff I have is 3 7/8")."

Here's what you posted.
 

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+ I was planning on floating it over a pad/vapor barrier
HOWEVER, I just read the manufacturers instructions and they explicitly say NOT to float flooring that is <5" width (the stuff I have is 3 7/8")."

Here's what you posted.
Right. In plain English my statement reads:

In the instructions, they explicitly say not to float flooring that is less than five inches in length, whereas the materials I bought are three and seven eights of an inch wide which is less than five inches.
 

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Right. In plain English my statement reads:

In the instructions, they explicitly say not to float flooring that is less than five inches in length, whereas the materials I bought are three and seven eights of an inch wide which is less than five inches.
the bolded "Length" should be "Width". Oops
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You said NOT to float flooring that is 5" in width,and that your's is 3 7/8",now how would you take that??????
I feel like this has devolved pretty heavily. I guess my original question was "how seriously would you take the mfg recommendation?" I can guess what the response may be, but was confused since you opened your first response with:

Well then you can install it as a floating installation,as your under the 5" width,and take that MDF up before you install and replace it with real wood
If you don't have anything to add beyond what I've heard so far, feel free to ignore this thread.
 
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