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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not sure why, but the previous owners thought it would be funny (?) to not only remove all trees over the roof but also shove insulation batts to block off the soffits. What is the easiest way to remove all of these batts? I tried going into the attic with a small rake, but the angle of the room is way too steep to reach into the area and pull the insulation out.

Please let me know the best way to approach this; I've reached out to handymen on craigslist but haven't actually met with one yet. I considered putting in an attic fan to help with circulation but I've also heard an attic fan with poor circulation will consume double the energy! Also, can I approach it from below?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the quick responses fellas.

The leaf blower would unfortunately not work, they're tucked pretty nicely in there. I tried to reach from inside the attic with a small rake, but unfortunately it just kind of teared the insulation batt without moving it out of the way. Any ideas of something longer with a stronger grasp?

As far as images, this is my rental home and will have to try to make my way over to get images .

I apologize for the HORRIBLE image but this is essentially the issue (except I don't have baffles)

 

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I’m doubtful that anyone would push an insulation batt out that far, since it isn’t insulating anything at that point and it would be moderately difficult to do. How do you know that the insulation is actually in the soffit like that? Typically, you wouldn’t be able to see what you’ve scribbled in yellow. Are you looking up through soffit vents?

Insulation batts are typically 4 feet long. Why can’t you grab the end and haul it back in? What is the roof pitch?

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I’m doubtful that anyone would push an insulation batt out that far, since it isn’t insulating anything at that point and it would be moderately difficult to do. How do you know that the insulation is actually in the soffit like that? Typically, you wouldn’t be able to see what you’ve scribbled in yellow. Are you looking up through soffit vents?

Insulation batts are typically 4 feet long. Why can’t you grab the end and haul it back in? What is the roof pitch?

Chris

Im guessing maybe they cut it, its not 100% visible to see, but that being said - when looking from inside the attic there is definitely some insulation shoved into the small space you can see between the attic and soffit vent. it isn't blown insulation, you can see it has a paper bottom type, but its thicker than the gap between the attic slope angle entrance that it doesn't just pop right out. The inspector of my home also noted the issue on the inspection report - though he told me the fix would be to just pull it out except its obviously harder than that !
 

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I think it depends on where you live. Passive venting, using soffit to ridge air flow, was made to prevent ice dam damages: Since it was impossible to make the eave area cold, instead, let the cold air prevent melting snow/ice leaking into the wall. So if you don't have lots of snow staying along the eave, no need for soffit vents. It is also usual to lay down a layer of weather sheet (forget the name) that closes around the nails and prevent dammed water from leaking into the house. Passive venting also do not cool the attic. Not enough to help with AC bill or to feel cooler beneath.



If you have problems with ice dam and want the soffit vent, you have to crawl to the eave and look at the insulation. If insulation is stuffed into the soffit space, you will have to pull them out (rake, vac, one of those toy fork that close when a handle is pulled, whatever it takes). Then soffit vent, bay baffle, close off the rafter bay, and finish with stuffing as much insulation that'll fit. If soffit is empty, you can shove baffles over the insulation to open the air way. Soffit vents have to be big enough (I used vinyl soffit cover with 100% holes), baffles have to be deep enough (!" deep is worse than 2"), ridge vents have to be big enough (those mesh type that squeesh into 1/4" layer is not good).



I have an attic vent fan. It makes downstairs rooms feel significantly cooler when not using the window AC.
 

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I had the exact same problem in my new-to-me home at the time. Same low-angle problem, because it's a ranch with a hip roof. I found an ice hockey stick worked real well.

Something I probably would've never thought of had I not already had a couple of them from my pick-up ice hockey days :)

Btw: Why it was done was probably because once-upon-a-time it was thought by some making the attic crawl space dead air would lead to better energy efficiency.
 

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I can reach to the top plate and maybe beyond (never needed to) on 3 or 4 pitch roofs by laying plywood or boards on the joists and shimmying on my belly as far til my head doesn't hit the shingle nails popping thru. Also agree with using a reach tool if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I had a tiny rake I was trying to use, it reached the beginning of the insulation but couldn't get a great grip, just kind of shredded the insulation. Just trying to think of something that has a stronger extended grip
 
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