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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm re-siding the front of my house, and in the process, replacing and altering much of the trim. For example, at the corners, I am butting the siding to the inside edge of vertical trim pieces, rather than using the clapboard corner angles which had been in-place, previously. The new trim is PVC board.

I'm in a quandry over the best way to paint the siding such that I make it easiest on myself in terms of being able to avoid getting the house color all over the nice, brilliant white trim...

At first I had thought that I would pre-paint the siding, prior to putting it up. But I don't think it's practical, as the space I have to work with on my property simply won't allow it.

Masking seems highly impractical, as I can't imagine it taking anything less than a full day, or more, to properly apply individual pieces along each, individual clapboard edge. It also seems like a big, time-consuming challenge to rely on my brush skills for cutting into each edge with precision.

Is there a fairly easy answer? Do any of these tools such as "Shurline" and the like work at all? Are they just more trouble than they are actually worth, for a job such as this?
 

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Don't you plan on painting your new trim? Do you plan on skipping the caulking process to that trim?

I think you would want to use a quality construction caulking like Quad, oil based. An easier product to use would be painter grade caulking, like Ben moore 60 year siliconized acrylic, or Big Stretch, DAP Alex plus, but they're not as tough as quad.

If you do that, the way to go would be to paint the didinh, getting some on the trim, then paint the trim.

If you don't want to paint the side you can keep it the body color. So you can trim out the face, or paint the edge also if you want. Painting the side is called "french cut". You can brush that, or mask the body off with tape and paper and spray it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, this makes sense to me. I've always had a bit of a problem with my caulking skills, and honestly didn't know of Quad. I looked into it, and that does indeed look like really good stuff. I have always used the DAP stuff, and it does apply fairly nicely, but I am always a little disappointed with the end-result.

I'll be honest and say that I did not originally intend to paint the trim. Part of the reason I went with PVC board is that it's got such a nice, clean, white surface, to begin with. But in working with it, and getting it installed, I came to realize that in order for it to look good, I'm definitely going to have to paint it.

The idea of doing a pretty-good job with cutting-in the edges, and then caulking over them is probably the best idea I've heard, and that's what I'll pursue. I do want to be careful with the caulk, though, and not overdo it. Part of the serious problems that I saw with the old siding installation -- that I just removed -- is that someone had really run wild with the caulk gun, and plugged-up numerous places where it would've been far better to leave some gaps and exit points for moisture flow. Including -- I kid you not -- a complete seal on the underside of every single clapboard. I was in shock over that one...
 

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Thanks, this makes sense to me. I've always had a bit of a problem with my caulking skills, and honestly didn't know of Quad. I looked into it, and that does indeed look like really good stuff. I have always used the DAP stuff, and it does apply fairly nicely, but I am always a little disappointed with the end-result.

I'll be honest and say that I did not originally intend to paint the trim. Part of the reason I went with PVC board is that it's got such a nice, clean, white surface, to begin with. But in working with it, and getting it installed, I came to realize that in order for it to look good, I'm definitely going to have to paint it.

The idea of doing a pretty-good job with cutting-in the edges, and then caulking over them is probably the best idea I've heard, and that's what I'll pursue. I do want to be careful with the caulk, though, and not overdo it. Part of the serious problems that I saw with the old siding installation -- that I just removed -- is that someone had really run wild with the caulk gun, and plugged-up numerous places where it would've been far better to leave some gaps and exit points for moisture flow. Including -- I kid you not -- a complete seal on the underside of every single clapboard. I was in shock over that one...

That's cool you are researching and planning. Make sure you caulk before any painting. Caulking Needs to be (primed and) painted. It will not look good nor last if it is exposed. Caulk the trim and other necessary stuff, then prime trim (and siding if needed). Use an oil based primer like z-prime, coverstain, or Ben Moore Fresh Start alkyd.
Then go for the painting. If painting the side of the trim is too time consuming now, just face paint the trim. It can be finished next year if you need it done.
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Btw with Quad, it's not meant to ne wiped like painter's caulking is. Is will shrink too much and fail soon in time. It's all about cutting the caulking tube tip about 1/4" wide open, or 3/16". Put perfect pressure, squeeze continually down each board. The tube's tip is supposed to lay it out solid.
If you need to wipe a small spot or clean the caulking tube tip, WD-40 on a rag will work for that.
 
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