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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
13 years ago when I moved into my house, the cinder block wall between my integrated garage and basement had cracked mortar on both sides along some of the blocks. The mortar was removed and replaced. Now, the same exact blocks have the same problem. The mortar is just crumbling. The rest of the wall is still the same and nothing changed. Seems like the mortar used just deteriorated. Both sides are like that with the basement side being worse. It's a separating wall but not a load bearing one. Is it ok to use something like DAP concrete patch to replace the mortar (comes pre-mixed in a smaller plastic tub), the concrete "caulk" applied with a caulk gun, or do I have to mix up new mortar? I've not mixed mortar before, so I'm looking for what is acceptable but easier if possible. I'm new to this, so I don't know if it makes any difference. Thanks
 

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Do you know what the mortar was replaced with a decade ago? It might have been the wrong product, or a product that only had a lifespan of a decade. If I were you I would probably get one of those concrete patch or concrete caulk products that appears to be suited for a wall application. From my reading it appears that many of the concrete crack/patch fillers are designed for driveways and sidewalks, and as such they are designed to be self leveling and thus would not be good for a wall application.

The product you mention claims to work on walls so it is probably a good choice. I have literally only replaced a single brick in my wall and from that experience I think you will find it difficult to fill in the crack with traditional mortar, as mortar is just too coarse. Though with proper tools and right water ratio perhaps you could squeeze enough in to bind to the existing material if you first removed enough of the existing mortar using something like an angle grinder before patching.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you. The DAP product would definitely be easy to work with. Are the joints a structural thing, or more of a "stop water and bugs" from getting in thing? In other words, does the product used in between the blocks matter structurally?
 

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Thank you. The DAP product would definitely be easy to work with. Are the joints a structural thing, or more of a "stop water and bugs" from getting in thing? In other words, does the product used in between the blocks matter structurally?
CMU mortar joints are normally Structural.
CMU are laid using a type "N" or Type "S" mortar.
If the repairs made 13 years ago were made with a mortar containing to much Lime & you are in an area where there is a high salt content like along the coast this maybe the reason for failure?
Use a type "N" or "S" mortar for the repair, cut the existing failing mortar out & replace.
 
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