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Discussion Starter #1
I have two separate exterior chimneys for my furnace and fireplace. The oustide concrete for the furnace chimney has cracked and some pieces have already fallen off. We recently installed a new stainless steel liner which was probably one of the causes of the cracking. Another reason is that the previous owner decided to go the cheap route and not wire the chimney before applying the stucco. Since a small part of the chimney stucco has already fallen off and there are line cracks on other sections of the stucco, is it possible to repair this without knocking off all the stucco and starting from scratch?

The fireplace chimney has only a few small cracks barely noticeable but it seems that water already penetrated through the stucco and you hear a hollow sound when knocking on it, will waterproofing the stucco fix the problem? I want to try to fix this before it starts falling off like the furnace chimney?

Is there a stucco that you can apply to a chimney that does not need wiring?
 

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I am not a mason, but stucco needs something rougher than brick or block to hold onto. That is the purpose of metal lath. If it is not holding tightly, you have you answer. Tear it off and do it right, or patch every so often.
 

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Yes there is a product that is fiber re-enforced and has a polymer in it called fiberglass re-enforces stucco made by quick crete and I think some other brands under different names.

Sakrete may make it to though the best one was made by Conproco but I think they are out of business or bought up.

It was designed for Parging, a technique of skiming a 1/2 layer of material over the face of cement block, dry laid in place. Sometimes called STACK and BOND.

STACK and BOND stucco, may be one of the names it goes by also.

It will adhere to almost anything including metal shovels so clean up well.
No prep needed other than to clean off the surface and dampen it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Is this Conproco product a solution for breaking down furnace chimney? Are there local dealers that can do this? If I understood it correctly, this conproco product will be applied to the outside of my chimney without the use of the wire. Is that correct?

What about my fireplace chimney that is still in-tact but has a hollow sound when you knock on it. What can I do to prolong the life of that chimney?
 

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Is this Conproco product a solution for breaking down furnace chimney? Are there local dealers that can do this? If I understood it correctly, this conproco product will be applied to the outside of my chimney without the use of the wire. Is that correct?

What about my fireplace chimney that is still in-tact but has a hollow sound when you knock on it. What can I do to prolong the life of that chimney?
The products I mentioned are for interior or exterior, on stable masonry.
To fix unbonded masonry there is only on way. Tear it off.

However an optioned I used once was to mechanically screw a layer of wire lathe over some loose stucco with washers and tapcon screws and re build out the entire area using the screws and wire to mechanically hold the lose under layer together.

Tearing off may have been easier though it was the method we chose and it worked.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I got a quote for over $3,000 to tear down and rebuild both chimneys. I really dont have that kind of money. Would it be better and more inexpensive to install siding on both chimneys. I have all the necessary materials that was left by the previous owner.

I spoke to the town and they said I would need a permit and the wood needs to be built a few inches away from the chimney. How difficult and expensive would this route be compared to tearing down my stucco? I was thinking the siding install would be a more permanent solution. Any thoughts?
 

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I got a quote for over $3,000 to tear down and rebuild both chimneys. I really dont have that kind of money. Would it be better and more inexpensive to install siding on both chimneys. I have all the necessary materials that was left by the previous owner.

I spoke to the town and they said I would need a permit and the wood needs to be built a few inches away from the chimney. How difficult and expensive would this route be compared to tearing down my stucco? I was thinking the siding install would be a more permanent solution. Any thoughts?
I am guessing since you haven't any pictures, that wood needs to be two inches away from a chimney accept where there is sufficient layers of material to warrant touching like the outside edges to make a weather seal.

I can't decide for you as I don't have a right to on speculation alone.
You need to spend some money or develop a learning curve that will be backed with some effort on your part to address the problem.
Mere words won't solve a problem nor will a clever solution that just hides it. Installing a box correctly over an entire chimney may cost as much as a masonry repair would, I can't say not seeing it or knowing the situation.
 
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