DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a large asphalt driveway that is sloped toward the garage. Drain for all that water is at the middle as shown on picture. It tends to get clogged during heavy downpour from all the debris that was on the driveway. I would like to install a channel drain in front of the garage to increase the surface area to catch the debris. Also, there is a downspout to the left which i can tie the channel drain to. It should increase the drain flow rate.

Do you see any issue with curring the channel right up against the garage concrete? of course, i cannot install the channel drain up against the concrete as i will need to install the drain system in the middle of the channel with pouring concrete on either side of the channel drain.

Also, how would i cut the asphat right up against the garage? is there a cutter out there that can cut with such clearance?
655535
655536
655537
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,255 Posts
Where does the downspout go? Looks like it just spills into the corner.
Ypu can easily cut conctrete with a diamond blade in a circular saw. Buy a cheap saw, a cheap 7" diamond blade, and drizzle water on it as you cut. It will only cut about 2" deep, but you will have a nice clean edge.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,919 Posts
Youtube has some videos.
I have done a channel drain years ago, it drains to the street and it still works.
Just keep it and the drain pipe clean at all times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,099 Posts
Definitely put it right up against the concrete garage floor. Cutting asphalt isn't too bad you can use a diamond blade like suggested by the PP or you can even use an abrasive cutoff wheel in a circular saw. You can actually put the trench drain right up against the garage floor and just put new concrete under it and down the driveway side. You would just need to drill some rebar into the existing concrete floor.

Where do you plan on having the trench drain drain to?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,333 Posts
I think the idea may be to use the existing drain's pipe to drain the trench drain? I would, anyway.

OP you don't need to cut the asphalt against the garage slab. Once you sawcut for the outside edge of the trench, you should be able to pry the asphalt up off the face of the slab.

A trench drain is usually cast into concrete for stability, with a 4" wide concrete haunch on each side. So if you go with a 4" trench drain, you'd end up needing a 12" trench in front of the slab. But see what the manufacturer recommends for whatever TD product you elect to go with.

For the haunch next to the slab, make sure it drains toward the trench, not just flat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
How about just putting a larger drainage grate where the low point is. Still have to cut asphalt, but would a 12” x 12” ( or some comparable size ) grate do the job? A lot less cutting.
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
49,024 Posts
Just raise the drain so you have a catch basin for the debris
655616
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,333 Posts
So pick your poison—doing something and ending up with standing water, vs. doing nothing and ending up with standing water! :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
 

·
Wanna Be
Joined
·
211 Posts
I diverted water away from my badly sloping front doorway. Cut with circular saw and masonry blade and water. I used pvc mini channel drain from home depot in new concrete sloping away from the door. Cheap but it fills with dirt so I had to drill holes to hose it out periodically. I sort of think if you have debris then perhaps cutting a 3" deep channel lining it with 1" of concrete and covering it with a 6'x3" metal drain grate that you can just pick up and sweep the channel clean. Hard part is grading the concrete channel so it all slopes to that drain.
If you use channel drain that is pvc then there is no easy way to clean it out. What channel drain were you considering?
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top