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[QUOTE="HotRodx10, post: 6535514, member: 487337", it cost me about $1600, including the $250 for the final hookup.
[/QUOTE]
That’s a good price I can hardly get someone to show up and pick their nose for less than $500
 

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That's what I did; all in, it cost me about $1600, including the $250 for the final hookup.
Good luck with that price by January. All prices are increasing by up to 30% unless they walk back on their announcements. (basically every brand at this point)
 

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That’s a good price I can hardly get someone to show up and pick their nose for less than $500
I'm sure it depends on the location, travel distance for the tech, and the local market/cost of living. I poured the pad, set the condenser and evaporator coil in place, had the lines run and shaped so they were aligned with the connections, and ran the electrical to the condenser (power and controls). The tech was here for 2 hours @ $105/hr + parts and consumables.
 

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Good luck with that price by January.
That was 3 years ago, it probably would be significantly more now, even here. The OP would likely have to pay for travel time, too.

The point is, if you do the 'grunt work' yourself, you don't have to pay $100-$200/hr for a pro to do what most competent DIY'ers can. Then you just have to pay the tech for what he gets paid the big bucks for - the stuff we don't have the skills or the tools for.
 

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imo good pros have enough higher profit work and won't waste time and forgo markup to save strangers money.

Likely to get "that guy" who is desperate, doesn't use a vacuum pump and charges by beer can cold

Also, equipment defects/warranty is an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #88 ·
I have the Installer‘s Guide but there’s no fan info there. Probably impossible to find online based on it’s age. Sounds like maybe I need to buy soon though.

I totally have no problem installing everything then have the lines soldered, charged, balanced etc. I’m pretty much fearless of anything that I can understand. I did my basement finish(3 bedrooms, 2 bath, wet bar, fireplace)top to bottom(except the stone on the fireplace)with a permit and inspections. Part of the reason I’m here, since I’m getting pushback and bad advice from contractors. I actually watched some videos(no bashing please) on charging/balancing. I did auto a/c service/repair in my body shop for 25 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
imo good pros have enough higher profit work and won't waste time and forgo markup to save strangers money.

Likely to get "that guy" who is desperate, doesn't use a vacuum pump and charges by beer can cold

Also, equipment defects/warranty is an issue.
True that. It’s a small town here. Not unheard of to throw cash at a qualified employee off hours but I’d certainly prefer it legit. Warranty is a trade off for savings that I understand 100%. I’ve been self employed for 36 years, seen it all.
 

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Do a search for your model number's service facts. CFM will be in their.
 

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Part of the reason I’m here, since I’m getting pushback and bad advice from contractors. I actually watched some videos(no bashing please) on charging/balancing. I did auto a/c service/repair in my body shop for 25 years.
buy a precharged unit and diy then. most contractors in my area couldn't do a load calc to save their lives. entire HVAC industry is based on ignorant customers buying into what ever the contractor tells them based on an urgency to get it installed so they dont' feel uncomfortably hot or cold
 

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Who on earth are you calling? Even commercial rates aren't that high, unless you're including the actual work. (picking noses doesn't count.)
you must not do residential work. most hvac companies wont' even consider doing the vac/test/braze work unless you buy the equipment and gear from them. which means you have to search for someone via word of mouth, etc.
 

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That was 3 years ago, it probably would be significantly more now, even here. The OP would likely have to pay for travel time, too.

The point is, if you do the 'grunt work' yourself, you don't have to pay $100-$200/hr for a pro to do what most competent DIY'ers can. Then you just have to pay the tech for what he gets paid the big bucks for - the stuff we don't have the skills or the tools for.
Absolutely. I'm just saying equipment prices have already increased and are set to increase further. Our quotes are only valid for the day now due to the fluctuations in pricing.
 

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you must not do residential work. most hvac companies wont' even consider doing the vac/test/braze work unless you buy the equipment and gear from them. which means you have to search for someone via word of mouth, etc.
I only do residential work for people I like. My commercial rates are significantly higher, but we also don't give a rat's behind on how much or how little you ask us to do. Time and material billing is cheapest for the consumer, at least when I'm doing the work.
 

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I will give you guys this. Equipment required for refrigeration lines is extremely costly, and is a significant barrier to entry. I'm a master electrician who has some schooling in HVAC and enough experience to get my state license, but the requirements to be an electrical contractor are much stricter and there's no way I could get away with charging that much.

Perhaps there is a supply and demand issue going on here. I don't feel that it's ethical to price gouge during times of crisis or shortages of workers. There's a difference between paying your bills and making a little extra for your own prosperity and completely victimizing people.

Sent from my BE2028 using Tapatalk
 

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buy a precharged unit and diy then.
I would caution about the brazing/soldering part unless you have alot of experience. Connecting lines that will see 400+ psi is not something to practice on, and soldering with the high silver content solder (from what I understand) is not like normal soldering. There's also a fair bit of expertise required to evacuate the system properly, test it with Nitrogen, and know what the correct readings should be once it's all connected and opened (accounting for temperature, altitude and a few other factors that I'm only vaguely familiar with).

I design bridges for a living, and I've done nearly everything when it comes to remodeling and home and auto repairs, but the final hookup of a central air system is something I would not attempt, unless it was my only option and I was prepared to fail.

When I was looking, most all the condensers came precharged with supposedly the right amount of refrigerant for lines up to 25', but it's probably not wise to trust that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #99 ·
I would caution about the brazing/soldering part unless you have alot of experience. Connecting lines that will see 400+ psi is not something to practice on, and soldering with the high silver content solder (from what I understand) is not like normal soldering. There's also a fair bit of expertise required to evacuate the system properly, test it with Nitrogen, and know what the correct readings should be once it's all connected and opened (accounting for temperature, altitude and a few other factors that I'm only vaguely familiar with).

I design bridges for a living, and I've done nearly everything when it comes to remodeling and home and auto repairs, but the final hookup of a central air system is something I would not attempt, unless it was my only option and I was prepared to fail.

When I was looking, most all the condensers came precharged with supposedly the right amount of refrigerant for lines up to 25', but it's probably not wise to trust that.
“something I would not attempt, unless it was my only option”
My thoughts exactly.
 

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Perhaps there is a supply and demand issue going on here. I don't feel that it's ethical to price gouge during times of crisis or shortages of workers.
Yep, one will always get a better price when quoted in the off seasons of mild weather like spring and fall. In fact the reason I've had to learn about hvac is because I refuse to pay the rip off pricing or wait 1 to 2 weeks for a hvac person to show up with normal prices. When companies want to charge you $50 for reconnecting a loose wire on top of their $90 service call you realize how unethical this industry is. or the biggest lie they all engage in is telling you how f***ing expensive refrigerant is because of epa regulations, etc. and then you look up the price and it's 1/20th what they quoted you.
 
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