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I'm centering a ceiling electric box for a new light fixture. I have two cables going into that box. 12/3 from the switch and 12/2 providing power elsewhere. My issues is that the 12/2 cable is short by about 12 inches to reach the center of the ceiling. Looking into the ceiling the 12/2 wire is stapled to the wood. My understanding is that I can't simply splice new 12/2 to the old 12/2 in an electrical box and cover it up with drywall. Also, I don't want to leave the old off-centered electrical box with a cover on the ceiling for aesthetic purposes. Thus, my only choice is to run new longer 12/2 cable. This will require cutting into the drywall. Unless I can fish cable through the existing holes were the current 12/2 cable is. I'm not sure it will fit. Like I said the old 12/2 cable is stapled in multiple spots and might be a tight squeeze to fish a second cable through the holes. Any other options, suggestions, advice?



 

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retired painter
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If replacing the entire cable with one long enough to reach isn't feasible you could install a junction box above the switch and add a short cable there. I'd put the junction box either level with the top of the door frame or just under the crown molding.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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2 options open drywall to run new cable. Or use a blank cove on existing box.

I know you think the blank cover will be an eyesore but no one else will (except your wife) and both of you will forget it after the first week.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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Guys... I don't have the product in front of me, and I've never used it....

But, HD (and others I'm sure) carry a splicing unit that may be, or supposedly is, satisfactory for burying a cable splice behind drwwall and without a J-box.

Anybody know what I'm talking about and is it UL/or NEC cpmpliant..???????.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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Guys... I don't have the product in front of me, and I've never used it....

But, HD (and others I'm sure) carry a splicing unit that may be, or supposedly is, satisfactory for burying a cable splice behind drwwall and without a J-box.

Anybody know what I'm talking about and is it UL/or NEC cpmpliant..???????.
Tyco makes such a splice kit for 2 and 3 wire NM cable. It is claimed to be approved by NEC 334.40 (B) and it may be but I have heard most inspectors take a dim view of them. I tried one once in a exposed location and was not impressed. I would never bury one in a wall or ceiling. They remind me of the crap receptacles and switches they install in mobile homes and RVs.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Tyco-Electronics-Romex-Splice-Kit-2-Wire-1-Clam-A22899-000/202204326

 
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Master Electrician
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If the wires are strapped to framing you really have no choice but to feed new runs.


One option is to feed from existing box to new centered box. Keep the existing box and cover it with a battery operated smoke alarm.
I have had to do this a few times over the years, mainly related to repairs. Install either a 120 volt SD on an unswitched line or put a battery one where the box was located. No different then a blank cover, but at least it looks like it is supposed to be there.

Cheers
John
 

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Naildriver
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I have used the Tyco's to marry modular home halves together from underneath, and although they say they are code compliant, I don't think I would want to bury one in a wall or other inaccessible place.
 

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Thanks for the suggestions. Not interested in a swag light. Sounds like it's cutting drywall or dealing with the cover. Thanks for the responses.

Bear in mind "Center" is a very subjective term. You may be thinking of centering the box at the mid point between the room diagonal corners. Someone else may center it to align with the middle of a window or a door, someone else may center it with respective to a wall minus a hallway opening considering it to be the center of that "space", while someone else center it directly below where they decide to have a dining table, or coffee table. You may find the original box location may have a sound reasoning to be where they are.


Your other options are opening drywalls, drilling through plates, fishing new wires, or live with the existing box remaining to be accessible whether a blank cover or repurposed to make it look purposeful like a smoke alarm.


Look at the picture below the light fixture is not centered in the "room" but centered with the entrance and table.


 

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I have heard about this Tyco device and run into the same or similar problem several times in home improvement. I finally called my local permitting department and asked if they were fine here. I was told they were. I was told they aren't a piece of cake to install correctly, and of course the inspector was coming from the perspective that it would be inspected, and they'd want to see the Tyco device installed before it was covered with drywall to be approved. But other than that, they're OK here.
 

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Bear in mind "Center" is a very subjective term. You may be thinking of centering the box at the mid point between the room diagonal corners. Someone else may center it to align with the middle of a window or a door, someone else may center it with respective to a wall minus a hallway opening considering it to be the center of that "space", while someone else center it directly below where they decide to have a dining table, or coffee table. You may find the original box location may have a sound reasoning to be where they are.

Your other options are opening drywalls, drilling through plates, fishing new wires, or live with the existing box remaining to be accessible whether a blank cover or repurposed to make it look purposeful like a smoke alarm.

Look at the picture below the light fixture is not centered in the "room" but centered with the entrance and table.


This is an excellent example. With bigger rooms the light fixture is often in the "wrong" spot depending on how one wants to configure that room. My dining room is relatively small and not part of an open floor plan and has a nice fixture in the very center of the room. However with a buffet/hutch against one wall the table is pushed over and not in the center of the room, so the fixture is the wrong place. It works well enough for our family so it remains that way.

With that in mind I would be inclined to live with a junction box to extend the circuit. That way the move is easily undone or the light could be moved to yet another place in the future. But of course it is up to the homeowner to make it as they wish.
 
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