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Discussion Starter #1
Discovered my aging cat has been using a wall as a urinal

I exhausted all the normal cleaning methods have been exhausted. Smell only get stronger.

Carpet and pad are doomed but I can replace that cheap.

I think the urine soaked all the way through the hard wood bellow.

Stain runs perpendicular to all the planks over 7'. Replacing just the damaged wood isn't feasible, right?

Can I seal it in with polyurethane or something or is that a terrible idea?

I don't care what the wood looks like when I'm done, I need to get rid of the smell.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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There used to be a product called URINE GONE.

I used it when my aging cats were in their last years.

Search at any "feed store" type of outlet.

Maybe google it.


ED
 

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I had two cats for 17 years, they had ... issues toward the end. I was not able to get rid of the smell. Had to replace sub floor.

Depending on the size of the room and when your house was built it's not actually /that/ hard to replace sub-flooring. Down side is you typically have to pull up the whole floor to get the plywood sheet [sub floor] out.

I'm redoing the floor in one of the rooms of my 1977 house atm, not the best pic, sorry, was my "overflow closet" and I'm not done emptying it out quite yet, but this is what the sub floor looks like:

20200214_063256.jpg

You can see the individual sheets of plywood (I painted them white for GP before new floor goes down, but it's just 1/2 ply sheets.) It's not that hard to pull up a sheet, or even cut out a square of it at the floor joists. We'll be cutting out some areas in order to install new ceiling lights into the room below, probs next weekend. You just gotta hit the middle of the floor joists so you can nail the cut out section back down.


I'm not sure what kinda floor joist system they use in older houses or other countries though. In the US I think we switched over to a generally standard 16" on center floor joist layout in the 60's or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I had two cats for 17 years, they had ... issues toward the end. I was not able to get rid of the smell. Had to replace sub floor.

Depending on the size of the room and when your house was built it's not actually /that/ hard to replace sub-flooring. Down side is you typically have to pull up the whole floor to get the plywood sheet [sub floor] out.

I'm redoing the floor in one of the rooms of my 1977 house atm, not the best pic, sorry, was my "overflow closet" and I'm not done emptying it out quite yet, but this is what the sub floor looks like:

View attachment 586103

You can see the individual sheets of plywood (I painted them white for GP before new floor goes down, but it's just 1/2 ply sheets.) It's not that hard to pull up a sheet, or even cut out a square of it at the floor joists.
I don't have the back to pull up anything

The soiled floor boards are staggered, 3" x 36", staggered,run under the wall into the master bedroom.


It would look ugly as sin, but 90% of the problem would be solved If I could use a multitool or mini circular saw to cut out the 7'x 3" section (straight across the wall) and replace it with plywood.

That would mean cutting into 80+ floor boards. That seems like a bad idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Not a lot of point if the cat is going to continue.
You're right in that a proper fix is pointless until after this cat dies, that could be 6 years from now.

But the point is to be able to use the room again until then.

I'm normally really good at catching his accidents immediately, this is the first place were he peed enough time to make it through the carpet. He usually hits specific objects (my things) not the center of a bare wall.
 

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retired painter
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A pigmented shellac like Zinnser's BIN is the only coating I know of that will seal in urine and it needs to be a heavy fluid coat!
 

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iv'e used natures miracle a few times and it works!! It takes a while for it to work and you think it's doing nothing and one day you will see that the odor will be gone.
 

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Yeah, it's just emotional. Nothing wring with him.

Good. I did mean emotional, as well as a kidney infection.
My older cats get upset when a new cat is introduced, & try to establish territory, although, they don't spray.


I'm the one they try to protect!



I've had good luck with Bissell's pet stain odor cleaner,
 

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Get rid of all the animals that live indoors. Animals should never be allowed to live inside a house. People wonder why they are sick and have to visit the doctor. Amazes me.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Get rid of all the animals that live indoors. Animals should never be allowed to live inside a house. People wonder why they are sick and have to visit the doctor. Amazes me.
My doctor, has a Boxer that is in the exam room with us, and is probably healthier than most people.


ED
 

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Why have a pet if you're just going to leave it outside? ~shrug~ (Not really an option up here heh)


Anyway, to the flooring issue. If you have an actual wood floor (not laminate) then you might be able to sand the offending planks past the smell and refinish them...
 

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You're right in that a proper fix is pointless until after this cat dies, that could be 6 years from now.

But the point is to be able to use the room again until then.

I'm normally really good at catching his accidents immediately, this is the first place were he peed enough time to make it through the carpet. He usually hits specific objects (my things) not the center of a bare wall.

You probably know this, but, he's trying to protect you. Is there anything you can do to help him? Get an outside Tom cat neutered? Make sure he doesn't have an open screened window? It's his perception that will make the difference.


I had a door gapped & secured for the cats to look out. I thought they would enjoy that but it increased their protectiveness. Now the door is closed & they're fine.
 
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