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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have cast iron pipe, built in 1970. A galvanized connection is LEAKING. The scale and rust stops sewage from gushing out. Another leak is bugging me too, it is a little newer and a donut gasket connection. Rust blobs are appearing at the connection. How can I fix it? Will epoxy putty fix the leak? I HAVE NO WAY TO CUT CAST IRON WHATSOEVER. My idea is to use a pipe patch on both leaks until I can get a plumber. I can cut galvanized with a jumbo pipe cutter. That area used to be a wall (in the crawl space) so the joists will get in the way of pipe cutter, among other obstructions. The rust blobs are auto-genic healing, I think. The cast iron often gets clogged, several times a year. PLEASE HELP! The pipe must be rusting up. I may have to replace it. :censored:
 

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I am a bit confused by your post. You want to fix the pipes until you can get a plumber. You can likely get a plumber within a week or two at most, so what is the emergency? From your post, it sounds like the pipes have been leaking for a long time. In part of your post, it sounds like you want to do the work yourself, but if that is the case, why do you plan to call a plumber? If all you want to do is make a temporary patch, there are various types of plumbing epoxy that can probably hold for a week or two which should give you time to hire a plumber to replace the pipe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i am a bit confused by your post. You want to fix the pipes until you can get a plumber. You can likely get a plumber within a week or two at most, so what is the emergency? From your post, it sounds like the pipes have been leaking for a long time. In part of your post, it sounds like you want to do the work yourself, but if that is the case, why do you plan to call a plumber? If all you want to do is make a temporary patch, there are various types of plumbing epoxy that can probably hold for a week or two which should give you time to hire a plumber to replace the pipe.
i do want to fix the pipes myself if i can, but i have no way to cut them.
 

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i do want to fix the pipes myself if i can, but i have no way to cut them.
Ayuh,.... That just means ya gotta buy a new toy,.... er,.. Tool,...

Ya plan for slatherin' things with plastics, Ain't gonna work,....

Start yer plan to replace the rotten plumbin',.....
Do it all at once, 'n it's much easier,....
 

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You could get a whole sawzall set for cheaper than THAT service call, trust me.

Look on craigslist for someone selling used tools. You'll need the right blade for cutting cast iron but it's not crazy expensive or anything. Makita is a great cordless tool brand, and Milwaukee is particularly good at making Sawzalls. But really any 18v will do for the amount of work you're going to do with it. A corded sawzall even brand new will not be very expensive at all, if you can make it work for your site.

We've been forced to use our Makita 18v sawzall literally COMPLETELY submerged on multiple occasions (high water table on sewer connections, yay. Don't even ask for details on how good those glued joints are), and the thing has never needed anything more than a good JB-80 washing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You could get a whole sawzall set for cheaper than THAT service call, trust me.

Look on craigslist for someone selling used tools. You'll need the right blade for cutting cast iron but it's not crazy expensive or anything. Makita is a great cordless tool brand, and Milwaukee is particularly good at making Sawzalls. But really any 18v will do for the amount of work you're going to do with it. A corded sawzall even brand new will not be very expensive at all, if you can make it work for your site.

We've been forced to use our Makita 18v sawzall literally COMPLETELY submerged on multiple occasions (high water table on sewer connections, yay. Don't even ask for details on how good those glued joints are), and the thing has never needed anything more than a good JB-80 washing.
I happen to be getting a Sawzall to cut steel for my metalworking projects, so I will fix the drain once I get it. For the 3 inch cast iron, I will use 2 fernco fittings, ABS pipe and a new elbow. I will strap the pipe to the floor joists, as the elbow and other pipe supported it. It is amazing how good the pipe looks outside but inside it is rotten.

For the galvanized, I will replace all of the galvanized.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Pipe materials are getting worse. First, there is clay, very durable, supports soil weight, will not rust or decay. All pipe has equal chance of roots. Next, came cast iron, durable, strong, but horrid corrosion resistance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ayuh,.... That just means ya gotta buy a new toy,.... er,.. Tool,...

Ya plan for slatherin' things with plastics, Ain't gonna work,....

Start yer plan to replace the rotten plumbin',.....
Do it all at once, 'n it's much easier,....

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

How can I patch the leaks?
 

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Purchase a sawzall and cut the pipe out with a cast iron blades. Make sure you support the pipe above your cut firmly.

Use fernco proflex adapters. Not the stupid all rubber junk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
purchase a sawzall and cut the pipe out with a cast iron blades. Make sure you support the pipe above your cut firmly.

Use fernco proflex adapters. Not the stupid all rubber junk.
i will use fernco proflex. I am getting a sawzall anyways because i will need one, so i will get it a little earlier. Down with bolsheviks!

Keep calm and get inked.
I love ink.
 
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