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Discussion Starter #1
People,

I have a p/u truck, which I am taking care of (its my friends), and wondering what I should do to keep the battery from "dying" by the time he gats back (in early Sept.). I have seen trickle chargers at harbor Frieght for less than $10. Do I need one of these to keep the battery OK?

Right now, the batt is in the truck, although, I told him to disconnect the neg terminal.........

Thanks!
 

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Household Handyman
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I hope this friend is in the military and you are keeping his vehicle for him until he gets back. That would be so darn nice of you. But, even if this is not a military person's truck: The best thing you can do for the truck is to drive it once a week. Treat it with care. Check the air in the tires, the oil level, all the stuff you should be doing to your vehicle. So you put a few miles on it, that's what it's for, and the best way to maintain it. Drive it, listen to it, look at it, give it back to him in better shape than when he left it---IF you are really his friend. :yes:
 

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Just in case you are in the market for getting a trickle charger, be sure to get one with a smart cutoff switch when battery is charged. Some so-called tricked chargers trickle all the time and in some cases will overcharge battery resulting in premature failure. Battery tender is a good way to go or one like it
 

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Thurman's advise is good, a minimum of 15-20 miles a week, assuming that he left full insurance coverage on it, and you are comfortable in doing so. If you want a trickle charger on it, get one as Roofie described, because, as he said, they can cook the battery if left untended. Frankly though, with the negative cable disconnected, assuming the battery is in decent shape to start with, it should be fine for a couple of months as is. I park our 'vette in the barn from about November through April, depending on the winter, with the battery disconnected, and try to get it out at least once or twice during that time, but it has been fine. I got almost 7 years out of the original battery, and only replaced it then because I figured that it was time for it.
 

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I hope this friend is in the military and you are keeping his vehicle for him until he gets back. That would be so darn nice of you. But, even if this is not a military person's truck: The best thing you can do for the truck is to drive it once a week. Treat it with care. Check the air in the tires, the oil level, all the stuff you should be doing to your vehicle. So you put a few miles on it, that's what it's for, and the best way to maintain it. Drive it, listen to it, look at it, give it back to him in better shape than when he left it---IF you are really his friend. :yes:
I've had to do a brake job on two vehicles that I stored---rusty rotors.:mad:
 

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KemoSabe
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I've had to do a brake job on two vehicles that I stored---rusty rotors.:mad:
At the very minimum, rusty rotors. In most cases, a vehicle that sits long term will need the calipers rebuilt or replaced as well. I had a situation last year with just that, along with a brake hose that was collapsing. All in all, new rotors, calipers, brake hoses, brake lines and pads, it was an $800 repair.

Then there was tires, which didn't fare well to 2 years parked. $750

Next was the rattling internals of the catalytic converter. With exhaust pipe and muffler, (stainless steel system) welded, another $600.

Bad ground on a brake light, another $125

Faulty oil sending unit and new starter, an additional $315.

Parked vehicles tend to go to pieces and hit you all at once when put back to use.

All these repairs were done within a few months of putting the vehicle back on the road. Happily, it's been running great ever since, well over a year.:thumbup:
 
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I just junked a truck that ran well when parked----I just knew it would cost more that the value of the truck to repair the damage from parking it for two years.----Plus mice got into the cab--yuck.
 

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KemoSabe
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I just junked a truck that ran well when parked----I just knew it would cost more that the value of the truck to repair the damage from parking it for two years.----Plus mice got into the cab--yuck.
I know.

I should've never dumped that money into a 1994.:whistling2:

It was my dads truck and I wanted to give it to my son this September, when he gets his license.

I like it so much now, I might hang on to it and buy him a Hyundai.:laughing:
 

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That's a nice truck---the one I dumped was a 1983----ran like a top---but rusty--and then there was that deer at 45 miles an hour---and the 225,000 miles---

You're a nice dad----my first car was a 1963 Olds Jetfire with the engine in boxes in the trunk!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, guys. I didnt know- just had a hunch- that a truck/car had to be driven 10-20 miles at least once a month, better every 3 weeks. I heard battery tenders can be risky. Time to call my buddy , whos not in the military, and explain to him. Dang, I dont mind helping a friend, just dislike driving trucks. Still, gotta do whats best, no excuses.......

Thanks!
 

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well, to answer your original question. you need a float charger, not a trickle charger. float charger monitors battery level. when it is charged, it simply stops charging. when it drops below a specific level, it starts charging again.

what you also want to do is to make a decision - do you remove battery or keep it on the truck? if you keep it on the truck, remove cables terminals, clean them well, i always grease them up with dielectric grease, set them back all the way down to the battery cover, tighten bolts, and spray over with battery sealant.
 

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KemoSabe
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That's a nice truck---the one I dumped was a 1983----ran like a top---but rusty--and then there was that deer at 45 miles an hour---and the 225,000 miles---

You're a nice dad----my first car was a 1963 Olds Jetfire with the engine in boxes in the trunk!
I'd take that Olds right now, even trade for the Dodge.:laughing:

I also have a 2001 Quad cab. The 2001 has 165,000 miles on it, the 1994 has 130,000. Both are 4x4 with 360s in 'em.
 

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I wish I had some of my teen age cars back----they were just 'old' then now they would be 'classic':eek:

1963 Olds Jetfire--215 CI all aluminum V8 with a turbo charger
1963 Ford Econoline van (lots of happy time there.)
1960 T-Bird
1956 Chevy 2 door station wagon(California car--good body-bad mechanics)

I won't mention the Falcon as I hated that one--:whistling2:--Mike---
 

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Household Handyman
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"I wish I had some of my teen age cars back". Don't we all wish this at one time or another. 1968, I was 19 years old, my senior year of hi school. In Oct. I bought a 1966 Mustang, white, 289, 3-spd., with a bench seat from the factory. Yep, they did that. And it had a "Rally-Pack" on the steering column, a tach and clock. I'd give both of them to get that car back, and the little blonde who loved it so much back then. :yes:
 

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The memories---Those only get better with time.
 

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Take a drive north to the Great Lakes state one of these days, Mike. I have just begun restoration on my '69 Road Runner, and it has been amazing, pulling parts out of boxes, thinking that goes there, this goes on the other side, and oh yeah, watch your knuckles when slipping that one into place. Not to mention other memories that I won't go into here!
 

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I'm over due for a trip to Michigan---I'll let every one know when I go.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
OK, float charger, for the record. Why then do they sell "trickle" chargers? What good are they? (Talked to my friend and I cant take his truck for a drive cuz he temporarily stopped the insurance!!)
 

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OK, float charger, for the record. Why then do they sell "trickle" chargers? What good are they? (Talked to my friend and I cant take his truck for a drive cuz he temporarily stopped the insurance!!)
Your original post indicates you are watching the truck for about 2 months. In my opinion and if it were me...you need not do a darn thing other than make sure it is there when your friend returns. And I am someone who takes meticulous care of my vehicles. I have two collector vehicles been in storage (not on the road) since about 2002...ditto a Harley. Now those have ....take your pick "trickle" or "float" ...chargers that shut off when battery charged. There are other things I do periodically for them...but for a period of two months....lock it, secure it, forget it.
 
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