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I am no "pro" but can hang crown. On my latest project (where I will be doing the entire house) I bought poplar for the crown from a mill (1/2 the price of finger jointed primed pine..... I also had them run some MDF for "scraps".

No angles in my house are exactly 90/45. I made 1' pairs of 44,45,46 and the same for the 22,23,24 etc... I went around the room with my bucket of pairs (tied together) and marked every corner with the matching pair and wrote it on the wall (where the crown would hide it). Also when the dummy pair is tight hold it and mark the wall on the top and bottom edge of the sheetrock with a pencil so when you hang it your can put it in that exact spot.

I also use a Bosch laser measuring device, wife bought it for me for X-mas. This eliminates the need for her to hold the tape measure. It is dead nuts every time (to a 32nd). Sorry for the crappy phone pic of the crown.
 

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I use a laser measuring device for doing my crown also. Makes those long runs super easy to measure.
I think it is one of the best tools I have for Crown, it removes any "droop" in the tape. I found that I had to cut the pencil line for it to work. I would mark the crown and if I left the line on the crown it was a 1/2 kerf to large....


I also used it when caculating my Sheetrock, insulation, wire, etc... Anywere you need a second hand with a tape measure it works.
 

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JOATMON
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I have no trouble what so ever cutting crown molding. Comes out perfect every time.

Oh.....and I have some ocean front property for sale in NM.

Anyone who says that don't have issues.....well, has never done in crown molding.

It's a lot easier if your going to paint it....that is what calk is for.....but stained? Yep...buy extra.

Slaughter...nice job....but only one comment....and maybe it's a personal preference....I would have finished the ceiling and walls first...and then put up the molding.
 

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I have no trouble what so ever cutting crown molding. Comes out perfect every time.

Oh.....and I have some ocean front property for sale in NM.

Anyone who says that don't have issues.....well, has never done in crown molding.

It's a lot easier if your going to paint it....that is what calk is for.....but stained? Yep...buy extra.

Slaughter...nice job....but only one comment....and maybe it's a personal preference....I would have finished the ceiling and walls first...and then put up the molding.
Thanks for the comment, the spackle guy I have can only work at my house on weekends. He is very busy with Hurricane work in south Jersey. He finished the cieling/wall joints first so I could hang the crown. Its paint grade so when I spray prime later this week it all gets done in one shot.
 

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noquacks;" But I do know this is not like putting together engine parts on an airplane."--- yet make sure to install it right-side-up; ogee-- up and Scotia (busy part)-- down, otherwise it just looks wrong ( good news; not to everyone); http://www.altereagle.com/How_to_install.html

Use a helper stick to mark the wall or to set the angle in place;http://www.finehomebuilding.com/how-to/departments/master-carpenter/coping-crown-molding-techniques.aspx

If a 12" saw, the simplest way:http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/techniques/archive/2009/08/26/goof-proof-crown-molding.aspx

Gary
 
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what gary just posted is the best way to hold the crown in place if your cutting crown in the sprung position.

as for getting your angles right the best tool to use is a starrett angle finder.. just check the corner first with it and your already within 1/2 a degree of the cut.. this way your not fussing with angles on the saw several times to get a joint tight . .

scarf joints also require fussing over, you will have to tweak your cuts no matter how good you are.. slight deviations in the wall or ceiling will throw off how the piece of crown sits which can cause a joint to be open on one point.. gluing the joint and nailing it is imperitive.. then sand it flush

now if your installing stain grade crown you abslutely have to have a deadly accurate saw that has no blade deflection at all. there is no room for error with stain grade. if its not tight when you install it as soon as the heating season starts the joint will open up even more as the wood dries out
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Thaks, people, for the replies/advice. Man, hope I never have to do this again....LOL
 

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I have no trouble what so ever cutting crown molding. Comes out perfect every time.

Oh.....and I have some ocean front property for sale in NM.

Anyone who says that don't have issues.....well, has never done in crown molding.

It's a lot easier if your going to paint it....that is what calk is for.....but stained? Yep...buy extra.

Slaughter...nice job....but only one comment....and maybe it's a personal preference....I would have finished the ceiling and walls first...and then put up the molding.
Exactly crown molding is the most dificult trim to install other than rope molding in my opinion. Paint grade, not too bad but your joints should still be fairly tight. Stain grade crown is very difficult, your joints need to be prefect every time and you need to know all the tricks to get your joints tight.
With this said, I had the pleasure about 3 years ago of installing walnut stain grade 7'' crown in an 80' dome. I can honestly say I learned alot of tricks on that job. Every 6'' we had to cut relief cuts in the back of the crown in order to bend it around the dome.
 

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AHH, SPANS!!!
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Exactly crown molding is the most dificult trim to install other than rope molding in my opinion. Paint grade, not too bad but your joints should still be fairly tight. Stain grade crown is very difficult, your joints need to be prefect every time and you need to know all the tricks to get your joints tight.
With this said, I had the pleasure about 3 years ago of installing walnut stain grade 7'' crown in an 80' dome. I can honestly say I learned alot of tricks on that job. Every 6'' we had to cut relief cuts in the back of the crown in order to bend it around the dome.

my trickiest crown job was a kitchen remodel where all the cabinet/shelves went up to a vaulted ceiling and we had to cut stain grade crown tight to ceiling and wrap top of cabinets. what a way to learn the importance of a micro cut :yes:
 
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