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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I'm renovating a bathroom in Vancouver, BC and I'm a bit stuck now due to a puzzled I have to solve - I would like to put a Nuheat heating cable on the floor (small bathroom, total of only 170W), a towel warmer (cheap from UK - 110V - 150W or 300W - depending on the answer I get here), a mandatory receptacle, 4 recessed air tight light fixtures and a motion sensor controlled bathroom fan.
My initial idea was to run one 20A circuit for all this, but it appears that it is not allowed to have lights in the 20A circuit here in Canada. My problem is that I have only one vacant spot in the panel. I understand that Canadian code requires separate circuit for the baseboard heaters, but I hope that neither Nuheat cable heater nor the towel warmer are seen as such.
My question is - would it be better to: a) put all of these on a new 20A circuit, b) put all of these on a new 15A circuit, b) put new GFCI receptacle and two warmers/heaters on a new 15A circuit and replace receptacle in a bedroom to GFCI one and take 14/2 from there for lights and fan in the bathroom. I'm not sure if any of these three options would be fully according to the Canadian code, but which one would be the safest and the smallest sin?
Thank you very much
 

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I don't know what the code says about dedicated heater circuits.
But these rules must be adhered to.
Lighting can NOT be on 20 amp circuits. It must be 15 amps.
Only 12 outlets total per circuit. Outlets = lights, receptacles, fans, heaters, etc. Does not include switches or occupancy sensors.

Bathroom does NOT need to be dedicated circuit. You can add it other nearby circuits as long as you don't exceed to 12 outlet per circuit limit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks a lot joed,

I'm just in the process of moving the lights to a 15A circuits. Since two of the recessed fixtures will be above wet area, I'm also replacing their supply outlet with a GFCI one (15A).
The final result will be that lights and fan are on 15A circuit, supplied from a GFCI receptacle and the main bathroom GFCI receptacle, together with the towel warmer and floor heating will be on separate 20A circuit, with nothing else on it.
 

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Is that a detached bathroom?


(somebody had to be a smart aleck)
 

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Most recessed lights do not require GFCI protection, even if above the wet area. In the US, there is no code requiring it even inside the shower stall. I believe it is the same up north.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
PoleCat, Oso954, thanks for your reply.

The bathroom is not detached. There are 2 bedrooms on each side of the bathroom. I'm not sure if that changes anything?

I was not sure about the GFCI rule for recessed lights above the shower stall, but I thought that it can't hurt having those lights protected by the GFCI outlet. In general, recessed lights should better stay outside of the shower area, but I installed fairly good fan, hoping that it will deal with the humidity before any light fixture is affected. That's the reason for motion controlled fan - for those who 'forget' to turn it on.
 

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Should be a similar rule for BC. But Ontario shower fixtures only GFCI if the manufacturer says so.

Question
Does the Code require GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupter) protection of a light fixture located in a residential tub / shower enclosure?
Answer

No, the Code does not require GFCI protection, however if the fixture manufacturer's installation instructions require GFCI protection, then the Code requires that the instructions be followed.

Rule 2-034.

Ontario Electrical Safety Code 25th Edition/2012.
 
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