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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the wood post that is not vertical as the level in the photos show (The yellow vertical line in the photo maybe just a little bit exaggerated).

20200228_134311b.jpg

Is the bubble in the level within the normal range?

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When this wood post was replaced by HOA about 10 years or more ago(they cut the post at the middle about 8 feet out of 16 feet and replaced the bottom 8 feet only joining the 2 post at the balcony floor level. I learned this from Nealtw in this forum), I think they did not put the wood post vertically. Because the wood post is not upright, I think the metal bracket at the bottom is (made?) bent and the wood post bottom sits partly on the lawn soil.

If I cut out the bottom 6" wood thus breaking the metal and wood join, can this vertical problem be corrected automatically? If not, how do I make this post vertical? Do I need to either tighten or loosen the following bolt on the wood post?

20200306_174303c.jpg

Or is it impossible to make the wood post straight vertical because of the un-straight or un-even cut of the wood post at the top thus joining the top post slopingly near the balcony floor or because of the joist hanger metal?

20200306_174229a.jpg

This wood post is the one I asked question on this post , and I am working on this wood post.

Thank you very much.
 

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retired framer
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You would first have to undo the bolts at the bottom and figure a way to straighten the bracket.

Then at the top the nails from the hanger into the beam on both sides would have to be removed and then add a new lag bolt, black arrow to pull the post in tight to the beam and replace the nails.
 

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Master General ReEngineer
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When this wood post was replaced by HOA about 10 years or more ago(they cut the post at the middle about 8 feet out of 16 feet and replaced the bottom 8 feet only joining the 2 post at the balcony floor level.
Ayuh,...... By the looks of the bottom of it, I'd say it's due to be replaced again,......

Just put the new one in plumb,......
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you Nealtw, Bondo very much for the comment.

Bondo, I was thinking about replacing, but I want to do the easy approach first.

Nealtw, I thank you again as usual for the right answer.

May I ask additional questions.

1. How difficult is it to pull out the nails? Is there any special tool that I should use for that not to damage the horizontal beam or do I use the regular nail puller?

2. Do I have to add a new lag bolt necessarily? Will the tightening the existing bolt not do? If tightening existing one will do, how difficult is it to tighten it? Is there any chance that the bolt head become damaged and rounded while tightening it? Do I have to unscrew or pull out the existing one and drill the hole deeper first before tightening the bolt?

3. Do I use those regular adjustable wrench to tighten existing lag bolt?

4. If I remove the existing nails and replace them after pulling the post tightly to the beam, will the new nails not be loose because of the existing holes nearby? If so, how do you solve this problems?

5. Do I do all this while supporting the horizontal joist or beam with 2x4 stud underneath?

Thank you very much.
 

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Thank you Nealtw, Bondo very much for the comment.

Bondo, I was thinking about replacing, but I want to do the easy approach first.

Nealtw, I thank you again as usual for the right answer.

May I ask additional questions.

1. How difficult is it to pull out the nails? Is there any special tool that I should use for that not to damage the horizontal beam or do I use the regular nail puller?

2. Do I have to add a new lag bolt necessarily? Will the tightening the existing bolt not do? If tightening existing one will do, how difficult is it to tighten it? Is there any chance that the bolt head become damaged and rounded while tightening it? Do I have to unscrew or pull out the existing one and drill the hole deeper first before tightening the bolt?

3. Do I use those regular adjustable wrench to tighten existing lag bolt?

4. If I remove the existing nails and replace them after pulling the post tightly to the beam, will the new nails not be loose because of the existing holes nearby? If so, how do you solve this problems?

5. Do I do all this while supporting the horizontal joist or beam with 2x4 stud underneath?

Thank you very much.
The first trick will be to straighten the bracket at the bottom.

You can pull the nails with a flat like the picture about 12" long.

If you can't get under the head of the nail, you can usually start it by prying on the hanger a bit, just to get it started.

Then you could try tightening the big bolt with what ever wrench you have, if it doesn't pull it in, pull it out and buy one an inch or so longer
If that doesn't work then install the second one.

The nail holes in the wood are stretched now so you will want to drill new holes thru the hanger for them, Don't loose the nails, they are special hanger nails and they are galvanized, and they won't sell you 6. You would have to buy a bunch. :biggrin2:
 

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Naildriver
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Very good advice so far, especially about replacing the post. However, I noted in the OP that this is a condo, and the HOA had made the initial repairs. Put the monkey back where it belongs and have them do it right this time. It may be a liability for you to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you very much chandler48, Nealtw for the comments.

chandler48, I thank you for your good suggestion. I will send them an email about this and see what they say, but they will probably not do it because they say it is a PUD and the property is mine.

Nealtw, I thank you very much for more detailed explanation. May I ask some more questions, though?

If I need to pull out the existing lag bolt and put in a longer one, do I need to pre-drill the hole deeper with regular drill bit or do I just screw the longer lag bolt without pre-drilling? Is it usually very hard to turn the lag bolt? If it is very hard, do you need to use any lubricant at all like wd40?

Are you mentioning the piece of steel tube to straiten the metal bracket? I was thinking of removing the bracket because my plan was to cut the bottom 6" or so wood post right above the metal bracket. The reason for cutting is because the other metal bracket or leg was broken and only one that the photo shows is remaining to connect and support the wood post. The metal leg on the other side was on top of the lawn soil and with regular water spraying, the leg bottom was rusted broken. So, unless there is a way to install the other leg into the existing concrete, I thought I better install a new simpson tie.

Another reason for cutting the wood is to raise the wood post bottom level above the ground so the wood post is not exposed to water as much by installing a new simpson strong tie and putting in more concrete.

I do not quite understand your following statement. Could you rephrase a little?
The nail holes in the wood are stretched now so you will want to drill new holes thru the hanger for them, Don't loose the nails,
Is it "lose" instead of "loose"?

Thank you very much.
 

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Thank you very much chandler48, Nealtw for the comments.

chandler48, I thank you for your good suggestion. I will send them an email about this and see what they say, but they will probably not do it because they say it is a PUD and the property is mine.

Nealtw, I thank you very much for more detailed explanation. May I ask some more questions, though?

If I need to pull out the existing lag bolt and put in a longer one, do I need to pre-drill the hole deeper with regular drill bit or do I just screw the longer lag bolt without pre-drilling? Is it usually very hard to turn the lag bolt? If it is very hard, do you need to use any lubricant at all like wd40?

Are you mentioning the piece of steel tube to straiten the metal bracket? I was thinking of removing the bracket because my plan was to cut the bottom 6" or so wood post right above the metal bracket. The reason for cutting is because the other metal bracket or leg was broken and only one that the photo shows is remaining to connect and support the wood post. The metal leg on the other side was on top of the lawn soil and with regular water spraying, the leg bottom was rusted broken. So, unless there is a way to install the other leg into the existing concrete, I thought I better install a new simpson tie.

Another reason for cutting the wood is to raise the wood post bottom level above the ground so the wood post is not exposed to water as much by installing a new simpson strong tie and putting in more concrete.

I do not quite understand your following statement. Could you rephrase a little?
Is it "lose" instead of "loose"?

Thank you very much.
Which ever, you don't want to buy a box of them so make sure you save them.

The post looks like it was pushed sideways to bend that bracket and it is leaning do the nail hole in the wood will be elongated, and no longer much good.
I would attempt to put in a longer lag with out drilling to get good hold but if it won't go in, then back up and drill it but a smaller hole so you still get good bite..


So you are going to remove the bracket and replace it and replace the bottom of the post. Good that will work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you Nealtw very much for the comment.

I sent an email to HOA if they could take care of this problem, and they say to contact a contractor on my own. They do not want to take the responsibility of correcting this. So, I have to do this myself.

May I ask some more questions?

1. When you put in a new lag bolt into the wood beam/post/joist first time, do you pre-drill the hole first or do you just screw the bolt in? I know that if I need to pre-drill, I have to drill smaller than bolt or screw core or shank diameter.

2. Could you guess and recommend what size and length of the leg bolt I should buy in advance to have it ready in case I need to use it? I can buy several different sizes and lengths and return the remaining after the work.

3. I do not quite understand your following comment.
it is leaning do the nail hole in the wood will be elongated, and no longer much good.
Please pardon me asking so many detailed questions. Since I do not have any experience in this, I have to prepare for many possibilities that might happen. I know very well that it is not easy when I actually get to do it. And if I make any mistake, it may cost me dearly in terms of time and money.

Thank you very much.
 

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Thank you Nealtw very much for the comment.

I sent an email to HOA if they could take care of this problem, and they say to contact a contractor on my own. They do not want to take the responsibility of correcting this. So, I have to do this myself.

May I ask some more questions?

1. When you put in a new lag bolt into the wood beam/post/joist first time, do you pre-drill the hole first or do you just screw the bolt in? I know that if I need to pre-drill, I have to drill smaller than bolt or screw core or shank diameter.

2. Could you guess and recommend what size and length of the leg bolt I should buy in advance to have it ready in case I need to use it? I can buy several different sizes and lengths and return the remaining after the work.

3. I do not quite understand your following comment.
Please pardon me asking so many detailed questions. Since I do not have any experience in this, I have to prepare for many possibilities that might happen. I know very well that it is not easy when I actually get to do it. And if I make any mistake, it may cost me dearly in terms of time and money.

Thank you very much.
The heads on the lag bolts are common to the size of the bolt. So measure the size of the head on the old one and match that size at the store.

To get a perfect hold the bolt should be twice as long as the post is thick.

So if the post is 3 inches you would want a 5" or 6" lag. Hot dipped galvanized with a washer.

You really want the threads only to grab into the beam and not the post.
So you can drill just the thickness of the post with drill to match the shank of the bolt.



Nails go thru a round hole to hold the beam and post in place,
we can see that failed when the post was moved out.
So the holes in the hanger or the holes in the wood are no longer round and no longer will do the job needed. So you make new holes in the hanger a little above or below the old holes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you Nealtw very much for the detailed comments.

I measure the size of lag bolt hex head, and it is 3/4". The wood post is 4x10 nominal, and the real size is 3.5x 9. So the lag bolt length to buy would be 6 to 7".

Now, I understand the meaning of loose nails or "elongated" in your previous comments. After I pull out the nail, if I put the toothpick with glue on it into the old holes, will that work?

Now I realize that just in case I unscrew the lag bolt out of the wood post, the wood post will drop to the floor. So, I have to put some support beam under the post before unscrewing the lag bolt and somehow do something to hold the wood post vertically in place.

Also,I learned from your comment that if I need screw in a new lag bolt, pre-drill only the thickness of the wood post, not the horizontal beam.


Thank you very much.
 

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w/o knowing 'master agreement' terms, you may be prohibited from repairing this yourself OR even hiring a contractor for same,,, i would opine, if you have letter from either hoa president OR specific property manager, that could be your 'get out of jail' card should any issue arise due to structural repairs,,, keep in mind hoa agreements usually specify you own from inside painted wall to inside painted wall,,, you're also generally required to have selected contractor insured per hoa rqmnts
therefore, all above responses may be pointless yet educational
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you stadry very much for the comment.

Your statement was my understanding until last April. But the HOA and the management company say that is my responsibility since our HOA is PUD, not a townhouse or condo.

Actually, they had been taking care of all outside structures and termites. But now they say outside structural wood and termites are my responsiblity. I have been pleading to HOA almost over a year for this issue to have HOA repair or replace. I even quoted the clause verbatim from the CC&R, which has not been changed since its creation, saying that the HOA should take care of this. They say they take care of roofing and painting outside, but not the structural repair.

I attended the HOA meeting and requested 2 times, but no dice. Last January, the lawyer they say for the townhouse legal advice, sent me a letter again saying it is my responsibility. I replied to the letter, protesting and re-explaining whole things, but no response yet. In addition, this damage was caused by HOA-maintained sprinkler water, so there is a liability involved also if they say it is my property.

I do not have any legal help and do not know how to handle this further. So, I am trying to repair myself since I learned that the post is not load-bearing but decorational.

I thank you for your comment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
In preparation, I searched for the post base bracket , and I found the following 3. Probably, there are differences, but for a novice like me, it is not apparent what are the differences and which one to use.

I am not sure if this forum is the right place to ask this question or not, but
Could you tell which item among the following 3 is the best one for my purpose of 4x10 wood post? Or should I ask this question in the Masonry forum? Or is there a better one than any of these?

simpson_strong_tie.jpg

Thank you very much.
 

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retired framer
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In preparation, I searched for the post base bracket , and I found the following 3. Probably, there are differences, but for a novice like me, it is not apparent what are the differences and which one to use.

I am not sure if this forum is the right place to ask this question or not, but
Could you tell which item among the following 3 is the best one for my purpose of 4x10 wood post? Or should I ask this question in the Masonry forum?

View attachment 588931

Thank you very much.
Those are for putting in concrete when you do the concrete,
You need this one.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Simpson...ERCH=REC-_-pipsem-_-300066049-_-100375358-_-N
 

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when you sue them in small claims for breach of contract, they MUST be represented by counsel as you're suing a legal entity,,, probably less expensive for the hoa to perform than paying legal,,, the hoa's the same as any corporation,,, lettuce know how that turns out
 

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when you sue them in small claims for breach of contract, they MUST be represented by counsel as you're suing a legal entity,,, probably less expensive for the hoa to perform than paying legal,,, the hoa's the same as any corporation,,, lettuce know how that turns out
Here that would be get three quotes, fix it yourself and sue them for a average of the quotes and $500 for inconvenience. No lawyer needed in small claim court, they would pay up.
 

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down here in the usa, corporations, by law, MUST be represented by legal counsel,,, corporations are NOT personnel - they are legal entities
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thank you stadry, Nealtw very much for the comment.

stadry, I thought about suing the HOA in the small claims court, but I think it involves time and attention to the very new legal stuff. I am not happy with the way the HOA and management company handled this. One neighbor that I talked to who had this problem, did not pursue to the end and simply repaired himself by paying a private contractor to do this. So, for now I just want to concentrate on repairing myself, learning how to do this. At least, it does not cost much doing myself, except for the time and this forum's help, esp Nealtw's.

Nealtw, I thought we are discussing cutting out bottom 8 inches or so wood post up to the top of the bracket and pour in concrete up to 8 inches embedding a new strong tie that I asked about. If I use the bracket ABU44Z you recommended, it is not connecting to the existing concrete. Is that OK?

I did not know that I could sue after I repair myself for the cost plus the inconvenience fee. Then, in order to to that, before I proceed, I have to get some more formal quotes from contractors. Last year, HOA contacted one of its contractors and got an estimate of $2650 for replacing the 2 posts, which I think, would replace the two 18 feet or so wood posts. One termite company I asked them to inspect last year gave an estimate of about $2000 for repair/replace. I have to see the details, though.

Thank you very much.
 
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