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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A home i just purchased has three large picture windows (45 X 80) that have rotten frames. The seal between the panes are good but the windows are actually falling down due to frame rot. The worst one has dropped an inch. Seeing as these are large and i assume very expensive windows, what can i do to save them?
 

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The design of these windows is the problem. The only water seal that can be applied is a caulking at the glass/wood interface. Otherwise water can just infiltrate as it did. As it will with every window with the same setup. This will happen when "home made" windows are installed. There's no thought beyond the "look".
Ron
 

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tjb1231-Boy, I wish you lived near me. I have a business doing what I described as "Household Handyman", I'm actually retired and need to stay busy so that's why I do this. Windows are one of my specialties, as no one else seems to like to do them. I have restored many windows in house's built prior to the 1950's, particularly in the early 1900's. Now, the answer to your question "Can these windows be saved?" YES! PERIOD! It's just how much time and monies you want to put into them. Based on the picture you posted with the rotten wood, it's just a case of determining where to start. First after taking many measurements-removing the glass. Determining what wood is rotted and needs to be replace is next. Don't expect to go to the big box store and buy this wood cut as needed either, all of it will probably have to be custom cut on site. I generally figure out the next piece, and make it before removing, as it usually is destroyed when removed. Provisions will have to be made to keep the window opening boarded up as the work goes on. I like to custom cut a piece of 1/2" plywood, paint it so that it doesn't look so bad and use screws as it will get taken down and put up many times. So-what are your skills, do you know someone with decent carpenter skills? Step back and look this one over really good and decide if you want to save these windows or pay to have them totally replaced? Good Luck, David
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses.

I do have wood consolidator on hand, and am having success on windows that are not in as bad of condition.

The house is on a shaded lot and this particular side of the house does not see much sun, and i agree the design of the windows is faulty. The house is only 30 years old and almost all windows need attention.

Thurman, thank you for your post. Since it only the bottom part of the window that is rotted, i was hoping to work with the window in place. I wasn't sure if i could somehow lift the window back up (how, i have no idea) and then work with the window in place. How would i attempt to lift this window back into place? i asume it is a few hundred pounds.

My carpentry skills are not great. I am afraid rebuilding an entire frame would produce poor results from me as my tolerances would probably be off. And yes, all the woodwork is not available at local stores. The trapezoid pieces would have to be made, which i am not confident in.

Does anyone have a cost on replacement windows of this size?

Of course money is always a concern, that's why i am trying to do this myself and repair rather than replace. But at the same time, we got this house for a steal because of the condition of it. I cannot spend too much time or money on windows because 10 other things need attention. I am trying to repair the outside so i can get a nice coat of paint on the siding to prevent further rot and damage.
 

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When I stated that I would remove the glass, that's me doing my work. It may not be necessary in this case as you will only be working with the bottom corner of the window. IF the glass has shifted and is not level, sometimes you can bring it back up to level sometimes by carefully prying it up with padding between the pry bar and glass and shimming under the glass until you do the final finished wood. I'd still give this a good try before having the entire window replaced. Good Luck, David
 
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