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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I was wondering if in a pinch and I'm in a situation where my ext chord isn't long enough, if I can use one of those light bulb socket adapters and then plug a cheater adapter (2 to 3 prong plug adapter) into it? I guess I could go the extra mile and run a ground wire from the grounding tab on the cheater adapter. The thing is, the bulb socket adapter says max watts is 600! I need to be able to pull closer to 1800 watts or 15 amps. I know this isn't ideal but just wondering if it would work. Would the adapter(s) get hot?
Thanks
 

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I wouldn't do it.
Not only is the adapter not rated for it, but the fixture probably isn't either.

How long is your current cord and how short are you ? Is this fixture you were thinking about mounted on the house, or is it a light fixture further out in the yard ?

What is the length and amp rating of your current extension cord?
 

· Semi-Pro Electro-Geek
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Definitely not. The fixture's wattage rating, not the adapter's, determines what you can pull. The fixture wiring is definitely not adequate for 15A. At least as importantly, the fixture is not GFCI protected, which is very important for any outdoor extension cord use.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I didn't use the adapter setup I posted about- its only a hypothetical question...Just happened to see on the plastic bulb socket adapter read 600 watts and I thought maybe it would get hot or melt if I wanted to use it. Sometimes I see regular romex connected to outdoor fixtures (like flood light fixtures) so was just wondering if I could tap into that and use it like a plug IF and only IF I took the GFI thing out of the equation by hooking up a ground wire to the bottom of the cheater plug (there is a green tab for this on the bottom). I'm guessing I could do it if I installed a ground wire but only up to the 600 watts.. So nothing big like a generator or compressor.
 

· Semi-Pro Electro-Geek
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I didn't use the adapter setup I posted about- its only a hypothetical question...Just happened to see on the plastic bulb socket adapter read 600 watts and I thought maybe it would get hot or melt if I wanted to use it. Sometimes I see regular romex connected to outdoor fixtures (like flood light fixtures) so was just wondering if I could tap into that and use it like a plug IF and only IF I took the GFI thing out of the equation by hooking up a ground wire to the bottom of the cheater plug (there is a green tab for this on the bottom). I'm guessing I could do it if I installed a ground wire but only up to the 600 watts.. So nothing big like a generator or compressor.
No. The fixture is fed by romex on a 15 or 20A circuit. That's not the problem. The problem is that the wiring inside the fixture (between the romex and the socket) is only sized to handle the fixture's maximum rated wattage. That's usually very small wire that can only handle a couple to a few amps. Sometimes it's only 18-20 gauge. You can only draw as much power as the LOWEST rated device in the circuit can accommodate. A 20A circuit and a 600W socket adapter don't do anything to fix the 60W (or whatever) maximum rating of the light fixture you screwed the adapter into.

Now, as for grounding and GFCI: Using a "cheater" plug to run a 3-wire device from a light socket REQUIRES that you run a grounding connection to the plug adapter. It's not optional. It also does not alleviate the requirement that exterior receptacles must be GFCI protected.
 
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