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Hi, and thanks for having a look at this question!


I have an outlet that reads as follows:
30A
125/250 V
NEMA 10/30


The treadmill has the following information:
INPUT 120Voc/60Hz
CURRENT 17 A


Can I use an adapter to plug in and go?


Thanks!


Mike
 

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It's unlikely you will find an adapter.
I would replace the outlet and the breaker.
 

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I'm not saying I'd do that but if I did, I'd also put a 20 amp overload protected power strip in the hookup. Those dog bone adapters are not widely sold anymore since they encouraged misuse. If you have to buy one, it will be cheaper to get a heavy duty extension cord and run that mill off of a wall receptacle. I doubt it pulls 17 amps under normal use settings... wouldn't if I was on it. :smile:
 

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I would replace the receptacle and the over current protection long before using one of those adapters.

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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They're pretty easy to find on Amazon. The RVers use them more than anyone else.

Also WalMart has them... 30-15 adapter

Aren't those adapters the 30-TT to 5-15 adapters?

OP would need a 10-30 to 5-20 adapter (if the treadmill is equipped with a 5-20 cord cap)

A quick google search shows that they make adapters but ONLY OUTPUT 240 VOLTS. OP, DO NOT USE THESE ADAPTERS! THEY CAN FRY YOUR EQUIPMENT AND START FIRES IF YOU ARE NOT CAREFUL!

A 10-30 receptacle is 2 hots and a neutral, no ground. It wouldn't be that hard to re-work the wiring (and breaker) to make a 5-20 receptacle work.

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Aren't those adapters the 30-TT to 5-15 adapters?

OP would need a 10-30 to 5-20 adapter (if the treadmill is equipped with a 5-20 cord cap)

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
Thanks everyone for the thoughts. I'm beginning to think it's time to call the electrician.

I hope using the existing wire will keep down the costs.
 

Electrician
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Thanks everyone for the thoughts. I'm beginning to think it's time to call the electrician.



I hope using the existing wire will keep down the costs.
I just edited my post to add to it.

Calling an electrician would be the simplest of you are not comfortable taking this project on yourself.

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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A quick google search shows that they make adapters but ONLY OUTPUT 240 VOLTS. OP, DO NOT USE THESE ADAPTERS! THEY CAN FRY YOUR EQUIPMENT AND START FIRES IF YOU ARE NOT CAREFUL!
That's not true... They output 120 volts. RVers have been using those for years to run their bbq spits and portable tv's. It wired to the neutral and one phase and uses the neutral for a ground... similar to how the 3 wire cords are used on ranges and driers. It's not the greatest thing to use but the need will always be there and someone will supply it.
 

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Electrician
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That's not true... They output 120 volts. RVers have been using those for years to run their bbq spits and portable tv's. It wired to the neutral and one phase and uses the neutral for a ground... similar to how the 3 wire cords are used on ranges and driers. It's not the greatest thing to use but the need will always be there and someone will supply it.
https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B078PHY3ZJ/ref=cm_sw_r_em_apa_i_lpHuEbB7KMGK0

Check this one out. It states it outputs 240 volts right in the title despite having a 5-15 receptacle. I also don't think it will have a UL or CSA listing because of that...


Although yes, you could easily build the right one, but I'm not going to tell OP how to do that. Someone else is more than welcome to though.

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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That would indeed be like a snake in the grass if the user didn't pay attention to what they were getting! My sis and her hubby have been using one of those for several years to power all their outdoor stuff from the 30 amp receptacle at the typical RV trailer hookups. Those adapters are common with RVers.

Thanks for the heads up, I'll have to warn her what to look out for if she ever has to replace the one she has.
 

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That would indeed be like a snake in the grass if the user didn't pay attention to what they were getting! My sis and her hubby have been using one of those for several years to power all their outdoor stuff from the 30 amp receptacle at the typical RV trailer hookups. Those adapters are common with RVers.



Thanks for the heads up, I'll have to warn her what to look out for if she ever has to replace the one she has.
The one like the one you shared is indeed a very common RV'er adapter. Standard RV receptacles are 14-50, 5-20, 5-15, and a 30-TT which is 120 volts, 30 amps, and only supposed to be used for RV's.

The ones that OP needs are much less common due to the 10-30 receptacle.

Anyway, yes, OP (well, everyone really) should be very cautious about any adapters they buy.

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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Here's the kind of adapter I was thinking about:

https://www.amazon.com/10-30P-T-Blad.../dp/B081NNSFZS
Just FYI,
Take a close look at the female end of that adapter, it鈥檚 a NEMA 6-20r. A 6-20r is always 240v.

You haven鈥檛 said whether your plug is a Nema 5-15p or a 5-20p which are 120V. It doesn鈥檛 really matter, as neither one of them will go into a 6-20r.

They are made that way intentionally to keep you from plugging a 120v device into a 240v source.
 

Electrician
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Just FYI,

Take a close look at the female end of that adapter, it鈥檚 a NEMA 6-20r. A 6-20r is always 240v.



You haven鈥檛 said whether your plug is a Nema 5-15p or a 5-20p which are 120V. It doesn鈥檛 really matter, as neither one of them will go into a 6-20r.



They are made that way intentionally to keep you from plugging a 120v device into a 240v source.
Take a look at the adapter I linked in an earlier post. The one I linked has a 5-20 but states it outputs 240 and to ensure anything you plug in is rated for 240 volts.

I maintain my suggestion of changing the receptacle and breaker.

Sent from my new phone. Autocorrect may have changed stuff.
 

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As Abraham Lincoln always said, "You can't believe everything you see on the internet." :biggrin2:
 

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Take a look at the adapter I linked in an earlier post. The one I linked has a 5-20 but states it outputs 240 and to ensure anything you plug in is rated for 240 volts.
I saw it. In fact, I double checked Amazon (US) to see if it was offered here (it is), and looked for a parkworld site.
https://www.parkworld.us/886344-p254.html

Reads as English as a second language (Chinese?)

While it might be useful for charging things that accept worldwide power, it Is generally too dangerous to leave laying around.

Although it鈥檚 apparently assembled from UL/ETL approved parts, that doesn鈥檛 make it a listed adapter.

I agree that changing the receptacle and breaker is the best route, if a ground exists in the box. If the ground isn鈥檛 there, I鈥榙 just run a new circuit and leave the dryer circuit as is.
 

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Are those things pictured and/or linked to really legal?

30 amp (male) plug to connect to 30 amp circuit and 20 amp (female) receptacle at the other end of the cord with no 20 amp overcurrent protection in between?

Two hundred forty volt (male) plug feeding 240 volts to a 120 volt (female; parallel slot) receptacle?

Ungrounded plug feeding a grounded receptalce?

(Haven't touched any of them in person so haven't proved with a multimeter that my allegations are/aren't true.)
 
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