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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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this

No those piece of equipment cannot be run thru walls.

400.12 Uses Not Permitted.
Unless specifically permitted in 400.10, flexible cords, flexible cables, cord sets, and power supply cords shall not be used for the following:
  • (1)
    As a substitute for the fixed wiring of a structure
  • (2)
    Where run through holes in walls, structural ceilings, suspended ceilings, dropped ceilings, or floors
  • (3)
    Where run through doorways, windows, or similar openings
  • (4)
    Where attached to building surfaces
    Exception to (4):
    Flexible cord and flexible cable shall be permitted to be attached to building surfaces in accordance with 368.56(B) and 590.4.

  • (5)
    Where concealed by walls, floors, or ceilings or located above suspended or dropped ceilings
    Exception to (5):
    Flexible cords, flexible cables, and power supply cords shall be permitted if contained within an enclosure for use in other spaces used for environmental air as permitted by 300.22(C)(3).
  • (6)
    Where installed in raceways, except as otherwise permitted in this Code
  • (7)
    Where subject to physical damage
 

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That said, I don't know how you can get your specific kit through a hole in a non-ugly, non-annoying way. It's an unbroken piece of romex that's premolded into the plugs on the ends. You would have to splice it. The splice would need to be in a junction box. You would lose some length on the Romex (12" is my guess) to get enough mandatory wire length inside the jbox. I am not sure if code allows the Romex portion to be modified per standard wiring methods (I would assume yes as a guess).

You sure you want this?

There are other versions of this where the Romex is not premolded on both ends, rather either one or both ends are screwed onto terminals. This allows you to get it through a reasonable sized hole without cutting and without extra jboxes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That said, I don't know how you can get your specific kit through a hole in a non-ugly, non-annoying way. It's an unbroken piece of romex that's premolded into the plugs on the ends. You would have to splice it. The splice would need to be in a junction box. You would lose some length on the Romex (12" is my guess) to get enough mandatory wire length inside the jbox. I am not sure if code allows the Romex portion to be modified per standard wiring methods (I would assume yes as a guess).

You sure you want this?

There are other versions of this where the Romex is not premolded on both ends, rather either one or both ends are screwed onto terminals. This allows you to get it through a reasonable sized hole without cutting and without extra jboxes.
well I’m remodeling the room currently, so I was going to cut out an access point above the stud and then drill a hole big enough in the stud so the cord will fit through it. What do you think about that method?
 

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Amazon stuff is dodgy as heck. You need to check if the item is UL-Listed. My sense is "mayyyyybe...." as it is sold by Amazon Proper (not 3rd parties) and counterfeiting Legrand Wiremold's brand is a lot bolder than the Chinese usually get.

If it's not UL Listed, send it back. If it is, install it according to instructions.

One of the exceptions is in-wall power kits explicitly listed for this purpose. There's a loophole those manufacturers lobbied for.

That's a completely different product that works a different way.

With this product, it has the outlet connected via in-wall wiring to an inlet which is mounted on the wall like a receptacle. Then it uses a common extension cord to jumper the outlet to the inlet.

That is the proper way to do that thing, and OP should send this Amazon krap back and get the proper thing from a competent retail shop. Retail shops have MUCH better quality control because FTC/CPSC watchdogs them. Trying to watchdog mail-order is impossible.


well I’m remodeling the room currently, so I was going to cut out an access point above the stud and then drill a hole big enough in the stud so the cord will fit through it. What do you think about that method?
If you use an approved kit that has you self-terminate the Romex, (or build your own kit with two junction boxes, an outlet, inlet and some Romex), then you will only need to get a bare plugless Romex cable through the hole, and that will fit alongside the existing Romex in the existing hole.

You'd really be making it hard on yourself with that particular product due to the lumpy plug molded into the end of the cord. Pick a more suitable product.
 

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^ ... and you're done lol. And it'll cost you under $20.

The only reason to fiddle around with the outlet/inlet thing is if you don't want to do that much drywall work, or if you want to route the TV power through a surge suppressor or smart power strip or something.

There are power strips that, when they see currrent moving on one socket, they will turn on all the other sockets. Good for PC+monitor+printer, or TV+cable box+game+Roku.
 

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well I’m remodeling the room currently, so I was going to cut out an access point above the stud and then drill a hole big enough in the stud so the cord will fit through it. What do you think about that method?
I think you're going to need a pretty big hole to get the cord plug to fit through, and it's going to require a good drilling equipment/skills and may still end up looking pretty massacred.

You should just bore a big enough hole for 12/2 to fit through, and find a kit that will allow you to do this. That legrand kit can do it, one end is unterminated 12/2.

It might be helpful for you to post pictures of the work location, then we can figure out how easy/hard it is to terminate Romex in an existing box (maybe there's one on the opposite side of this interior wall, or maybe in a single adjacent stud bay), that might look better if in the future you change out some furniture. But I appreciate that it might be easier to save some cutting or intimidation factor (IMO drilling such a big hole in a stud is pretty intimidating, which is something you were signing up for with your current plan...)
 

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Per the LeGrand websit







I thought it was against code to install flexible cord in a wall?







Answer: It is an NEC code violation to install flexible cord in a wall. However, the CMK70 kit does not use flexible cord between the plug and receptacle that flush mounts to the wall. It uses Listed Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable, also known as NM Cable. This is the same wire that is used inside the walls of the majority of homes today. NM Cable is covered by Section 334 of the NEC and is acceptable for use inside walls.















But I see an extension cord is provided in the kit? Isn’t this flexible cord?







Answer: Yes, the Listed extension cord provided in the kit uses flexible cord, but it is not run inside the wall. The extension cord is used outside the wall to connect power from the wall receptacle in your home, to the



CMmK70 kit.







Surprised me!
 
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One of the exceptions is in-wall power kits explicitly listed for this purpose. There's a loophole those manufacturers lobbied for.


Well the section that I believe you are referring to is in 400.10 Uses Permitted. I actually wrote one proposal for this and I got a call from the manufacturer thanking me so much for writing it. Those weren't my words in the section but it had that meaning. The manufacturers jumped on it when I sent in the proposal and came up with their wording. English is my first language and I suck at it. lol

400.10 A (11)
Between an existing receptacle outlet and an inlet, where the inlet provides power to an additional single receptacle outlet. The wiring interconnecting the inlet to the single receptacle outlet shall be a Chapter 3 wiring method. The inlet, receptacle outlet, and Chapter 3 wiring method, including the flexible cord and fittings, shall be a listed assembly specific for this application.
 

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Surprised me!
Another reason I think the exception is needed is that the flex cord might otherwise be considered part of the permanent wiring in the building. Which is generally otherwise a no-no even if it’s outside the wall (the permitted stuff notwithstanding, EG there’s this section we are discussing, along with a lot of exceptions for powering utilization equipment).
 
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