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Discussion Starter #1
I am redo-ing the kitchen.
As a result, I need to change out the light above the sink and the track lighting.

Below is what I am pulling out (track lighting) and what I am going to make (mason jar lighting)

How do I figure out if I have enough power in the circuit to not overload it when the new lighting with approx 10 bulbs is hooked up?
 

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JOATMON
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The big factor is what type and wattage of bulbs your going to use. You do realize that is one of the most ineffecient types of lights you can use?

Lets assume that you use 20W bulbs.....x 10....that is 200w. If you use 40w bulbs....400w.

You need to figure out what other lights are on the ckt....add up all the bulb wattages....then look at the breaker...it should be at least a 15A breaker.

In other words, you're just going to have to go around your house and map out all your ckts and make a list. It's simple math after that.

Side note.....you can reduce the power needed quite a bit if you use small CFL's or LED's.
 

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Lic Electrical Inspector
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I am redo-ing the kitchen.
As a result, I need to change out the light above the sink and the track lighting.

Below is what I am pulling out (track lighting) and what I am going to make (mason jar lighting)

How do I figure out if I have enough power in the circuit to not overload it when the new lighting with approx 10 bulbs is hooked up?
I love the idea but am concerned that the fixture is not listed and labeled. As for the circuit handling the additional load, if it doesn't the breaker will trip. Then lower the wattages or use LED.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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Lic Electrical Inspector
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My concern is in his post;

Originally Posted by MNDIY
I am redo-ing the kitchen.
As a result, I need to change out the light above the sink and the track lighting.

Below is what I am pulling out (track lighting) and what I am going to make (mason jar lighting)

How do I figure out if I have enough power in the circuit to not overload it when the new lighting with approx 10 bulbs is hooked up?



If it is home made it is not listed. If he installs one like the fixture you posted then I don't see a problem.
 

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those tracks will be part of the circuit breaker from something else..wall sockets and such,it will handle it easy if your building that jar fixture make sure you drill out the tops 360 degrees around to vent the heat with in and add up the wattage of the new stuff and divide by 120V ti get an idea of the actual amp draw vs the spots total watts
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My concern isn't that it is the most efficient lighting piece. To me, it is like a cute pair of heels. They will chew your feet up by the end of the night, but they complete the outfit. This type of fixture completes the look of the kitchen.

It is not hard to make. It uses all UL listed items. I am just trying to figure out if I can do 10 bulbs or if I can only do 6. The rest of the jars will be empty.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
those tracks will be part of the circuit breaker from something else..wall sockets and such,it will handle it easy if your building that jar fixture make sure you drill out the tops 360 degrees around to vent the heat with in and add up the wattage of the new stuff and divide by 120V ti get an idea of the actual amp draw vs the spots total watts
Thank you!

The tops of the jars will be vented. The guys at work are pressing out a design into the lids.
 

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they did that lighting on a Houe Crash and the home owner built it up was nice project.then on that Family Reno show the wife did one without the jars,and use electrical tinwall lenghts painted black with the lights at the end looked real cool over a dinning area...NOTE for you.... 100watt bulb draws .4 tenths of an amp...had to amp out a generator load when the night llights were running to total up loads...
 

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they did that lighting on a Houe Crash and the home owner built it up was nice project.then on that Family Reno show the wife did one without the jars,and use electrical tinwall lenghts painted black with the lights at the end looked real cool over a dinning area...NOTE for you.... 100watt bulb draws .4 tenths of an amp...had to amp out a generator load when the night llights were running to total up loads...
Uh, let's check the math.

Current = Power / Voltage

For a 100W bulb...

Current = 100W / 120V = 0.83Amps

For quickie calculations, I just figure 1 amp per 100W.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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If I were going to make my own lamps in this application I would use low voltage.
 
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