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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(I've asked this question before, so please bear with me :p The circumstances now are a little different than the last time I asked)

Here's the deal: my old wood-siding 19th century house is peeling paint pretty much everywhere. We've decided we want to get as much of the old peeling stuff off as possible before we paint. Currently there appears to be a layer of old oil paint or primer underneath, then a layer of latex paint. The oil primer is heavily bitten into the wood, the latex is the stuff that is peeling off.

I'm now using a chemical stripper to loosen the paint up and a hand scraper to peel it off. The chemical stripper is working remarkably well - almost too well, because the paint is melting to a glue like consistency instead of peeling off in rubbery sheets. The result is that it comes off easily but it's hard to get every last drop off.

So, here's an example of what an untouched section of trim looks like:


And here's a similar section of trim after being sprayed and scraped:


As you can see in the second image, a little bit of that top green latex remains. Spraying/scraping the section again doesn't seem to help much - you really have to dig to get those left over parts off.

What I *want* to do is prime over sections like that with my linseed oil based primer, then do the paint. But, will that work? Or will the remaining patches of old latex prevent the primer from taking hold and screw up the whole paint job?

Thanks!
Matt
 

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It's not ideal, but if the remaining paint is really bonded well, and/or soaked into the wood grain it might be fine.

The problem with leaving the remnants is that if they come loose in the future it'll compromise the integrity of the new coatings. You've went to all the trouble to get %90 of it off, seems a shame to stop now unless the remnants are really stuck (sounds like they are).

I assume you are following instructions on neutralizing the chemical stripper your using. Most of them (not all) require a separate step after stripping to bring down the PH of the wood to better accept a coating.
 

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If it was mine I agreee you would be better off starting with bare wood.
I've had good luck with a random orbital sander starting with a 40 grit to rip the old paint off fast, then going back over it a higher grit.
I buy all my sandpaper from Amazon and buy Mirka brand paper.
Just seems to hold up better and not load up like box store paper.
Better yet it's cheaper if you buy it in quanity.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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JMAY......

Agrre with your points unequivically and pragmatic advice :thumbsup:.... but interested...

Do you think that the product PealStop (or something like that as I think there are a couple of makers) affords any benefit/insurance.

TIA

Best

(PS: I tried the stuff about a year and 1/2 ago on an old pine sided pretty beat up 1951 build..... it stil looks good.... but its only 1.5 years... home is SF Cali.)
 
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