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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, so, here's the scenario: we've got a house built in the late 19th century. The current paint job is cracked and peeling all over the place. We're trying to repaint it, and our goal is a longer lasting paint job so we don't have to redo this nightmare anytime soon.

I've invested in a Speedheater (i.e. Silent Paint Remover). After applying a layer of boiled linseed oil and leaving it overnight, the top paint layer comes off like its made of butter. But, the bottom layer (whatever it is) won't budge. Here is a picture of a section I scraped yesterday:



Can I paint over this? If so, should I put primer down over it, or just paint?

Thanks!
Matt

P.S. Some of you may remember that I posed a similar question a week or so ago. That is because my first test was on our porch, and both layers of paint seemed to come off with no struggle. But, now I am working on a wall that gets sun, and on this wall the bottom layer won't budge. I've tried multiple coats of linseed oil over multiple days, but it just doesn't seem to want to come off.
 

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Not sure why your trying to remove paint with linseed oil.
All that's going to do is stop any paint from being able to bond.
How old is this house?
May likely be lead based oil paint that's not coming off.
Citrus or Soy based paint stripper will take it off safely.
 

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I'll bite......again. I see no problem with painting over that. I'm sure it's an oil-based primer from the silent era and it originally penetrated into the wood like a good primer is supposed to do. As long as it's clean.........go for it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Joecaption - I'm not trying to remove the paint with linseed oil, I'm using linseed oil to enhance the efficacy of the Speedheater. It's a gigantic IR heating element, and it works by boiling the oil inside the paint. But, if the oil isn't there in sufficient quantities, you can apply linseed oil, let it soak in, then heat it. It works phenomenally well on the top layers.

Gymschu - Thanks.....again :p So, here's my follow up Q: what would happen if I primered over the ancient primer? I know it seems like a dumb thing to do, but there are certain areas of the house where the bare wood shows comes out really fast because it's chipped away so badly. In the end it'd be easier to prime the entire house, even the areas where the ancient primer survived, as long as that won't prevent the top coat from binding. Can I do that?

Thanks!
Matt
 

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You can certainly do that. I would lean toward using a slow drying oil primer just because it keeps everything compatible with what you're doing and what was done originally with the house.
 
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Gymschu - you are my hero. We happen to be using a linseed oil based slow soak primer, so it ought to do the trick. Thanks again!
Elveax, don't give me too much credit, you know someone will be along to offer an alternative, but I am confident that you will be ok. I've done at least a dozen homes with similar "old-school" oil primer like yours and primed with an oil and had no problems, well, at least no problems that I remember!
 
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