DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is a follow-up to a thread about my dishwasher.

The existing setup is hardwired. I'd like to add a receptacle so it can be plugged in. The receptacle pictured is on a switch for the disposal. I'd like to add a 2 gang box and add a second receptacle for the dishwasher.

It would involve running the existing line through the 3 studs shown.

This location is under the kitchen window. Exterior wall. There is a jack stud, king stud and another stud that runs from the sill plate to the top plate.

Anyone see an issue with punching a hole through all three so I can run it to a receptacle under the sink? I see lots of information re: the size of holes allowed and distance from the stud edge. But can't find anything about my situation.
 

Attachments

·
Very Stable Genius
Joined
·
4,164 Posts
Sure you can drill that, it's done all the time. Bit I usually use is 7/8", but
1/2" is plenty for a single 14/2.
Drill as near the center as the next over stud allows.
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
38,887 Posts
You can drill all 3 or you can notch the faces and put nail plates over the wires.
Please don't say that you can notch a header support. It is really not a good idea,

Code does call for so many square inches of support, when you notch you are cutting that to half the square inches. It might be alright with a 2x6 wall but unless you know for sure there is no special load above it is all a shot in the dark.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
I'm not sure what you are asking. Can you drill? Do you have a strong gear driven 1/2" drill that can twist your arm off? Spins at 600-850 rpms. Use an auger bit with a 3/8"+ shank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,806 Posts
Please don't say that you can notch a header support. It is really not a good idea,

Code does call for so many square inches of support, when you notch you are cutting that to half the square inches. It might be alright with a 2x6 wall but unless you know for sure there is no special load above it is all a shot in the dark.
Cutting a notch just large enough to get a wire below the surface of the stud does not remove half the stud, it removes less than drilling a 3/4” hole. A chisel can make a shallow notch. Then since the wires are less than 1 3/8” from the finished wall surface they need steel plates. No one said notch away half the stud.
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
38,887 Posts
Cutting a notch just large enough to get a wire below the surface of the stud does not remove half the stud, it removes less than drilling a 3/4” hole. A chisel can make a shallow notch. Then since the wires are less than 1 3/8” from the finished wall surface they need steel plates. No one said notch away half the stud.

you can notch the faces and put nail plates over the wires.


One of these is not like the other.


just large enough to get a

wire below the surface of the stud

A chisel can make a shallow notch

The OP already had this in post 2

Drill as near the center as the next over stud allows.


It is not 1954 anymore, drill the dam hole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,683 Posts
Related RE notches vs drilling; from what I've gathered it's not "only" the depth of the notch that causes strength loss, its kinda where the load transfer points in any given piece of lumber is. A circle through the center of the studs allows the load to spread out "around" both sides of the drill hole, vs a notch degrades the /entire/ edge of the stud, regardless of how shallow it is. And I do happen to agree in principle with Neal that you don't want to weaken one side of something that's a support point - if a quake hits it could (probably would) "shift" the header load to put more pressure on the weakened [notched] end/side.

Not to say OMG it's gonna fall down if you do that or anything, but rather to say notching does lessen the strength of the lumber no matter how deep it is, vs drilling a hole in the center better mitigates the effects of the required "missing chunk."

** Note, I am absolutely not an expert, I just find engineering/house building really interesting and have done quite a bit of interweb research in my DIY projects.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,825 Posts
Talking with my engineer when building my house, I specifically asked about notching vs drilling and he confirmed, drilling is always stronger than notching. Always drill, whenever you can. Only notch when you have to. And follow code in both cases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I'm not sure what you are asking. Can you drill? Do you have a strong gear driven 1/2" drill that can twist your arm off? Spins at 600-850 rpms. Use an auger bit with a 3/8"+ shank.
Fair question. I should clarified. I wasn't sure if drilling through 3 would damage the structural integrity.

I do have a 1/2" drill. Not right angled. Might be a tight fit. Good excuse to buy another tool..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,683 Posts
Dewalt makes a right angle drill attachment, I really like it and use it all the time :) - https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-Right-Angle-Attachment-Impact/dp/B07NQS465R/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=dewalt+right+angle&qid=1583971054&sr=8-1


Also, I should have added this before, but if one has to notch they say to do the "sides" of the notch at angles, so more like a half hexagon than a rectangle. This "attempts" to redistribute/direct the load back into the "meat" of your stud. Also, notches on floor/ceiling joists should be done on the topside (aka closer to any load above it) rather than on the bottom of the joist - also don't notch into (and try not to drill into) the center third of a joist.


For your hole drilling, you want to be at least 2" from the end [bottom in your case] of the stud(s) as I hear it.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top