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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 36" one piece fiberglass shower stall surround. Can I mount a frameless glass door onto this hollow wall and if so, how should I do it to hold the weight? There is a flimsy shower door there now that I'd like to remove.
 

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You need backing or a stud for a shower door of any kind.
Before you buy a new door: Remove one of the screws that are holding the existing door, and find out if there's a framing member in the wall to attach to.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That's a good idea. If if there's none, which I think is the case because the screws of the frame of the existing shower door are loose, can I use really long screws that will go through the stall wall and into the studs that frame behind the fiberglass stall?
 

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If you’re lucky, a 3” screw will reach past the fiberglass surround, through the sheetrock, and into a stud. If there’s a stud there. Problem is, you will quite likely deform the fiberglass when you tighten the screw.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Does that mean I'm suck with my flimsy glass door? I can't believe that it hasn't broken in all these years as it flexes when you open it... and it's glass, not plexiglass.
 

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If you can slip (treated) wood spacer blocks in between the surround and the wall, you can probably do it, if there's a stud you can reach with screws through the hinges. You may need longer than 3", though. They're available, but it might take some shopping to find screws long enough, that won't rust.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
are you saying to cut out the drywall and slide the treated wood spacer blocks between the stud and the fiberglass? Then patch the dry wall on the outside?
 

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are you saying to cut out the drywall and slide the treated wood spacer blocks between the stud and the fiberglass? Then patch the dry wall on the outside?
If that's what works. You just need to have it so that it doesn't have a gap between the hinges and the wall. If there's a gap, the screws can bend when the door is open, and when it's closed, the bottom hinge will push the fiberglass surround in towards the wall and the door will sag.
 

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Better use a stud finder and make sure there isn't one right next to the edge along the side. If there is, you may have to make an opening above the shower wall and come in from the top to place a spacer.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I think I'm going to go with a framed glass door. I just hate all those nooks and bends that have to be scrubbed.
 

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If you had tried a long screw with no contiguous solid backing you would not have any lateral stability and the door hinge would eventually rock the screw to death with chewing up the unsupported fiberglass. The backing would have to go from the backside of the fiberglass and solidly to a stable stud for you to have confidence in the longevity and safety of the installation.

As you stated - go with a framed door it'll be the best choice. If you decide to redo that shower and install tile you can add good backing where you want and go frameless for a great look and easier upkeep.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've already decided that it won't work from all the comments. I do know that they make framed doors that have less frame and are easier to clean than the one I have and that's what bothered me the most... how hard it was to keep clean.
 

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Use a stud finder and figure out where the studs are located. Looks like you have drywall above the surround, so you should be able to extrapolate any studs found there downward.
 
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