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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I'm looking for some advice, any help would really be appreciated.

I'm looking to salvage a slab that I had poured a few years ago for a shed. Long story short, I'm now able to build the shed on this slab. Unfortunately, I misunderstood the easement and have just now found out the slab is on the drainage/utility easement at the rear of the lot. An easement "vacation" is a long process that I probably would not be granted so I am not going down that road.

The slab is 12X20X4" with a control joint running down the middle of the 12' section. The slab is 4" all around, that is to say it does not have thickened edges. The slab needs to be moved 6 1/2 feet "forward" (towards the house). Does anyone feel confident that this could be done without damage to the slab? What about cutting through the slab at the control joint and dealing with two 12X10 pieces?

Understandably, contractors are not willing to do this. I feel the slab cracking while attempting to move it is worth the risk since I had it poured by a contractor so obviously it wasn't exactly cheap. Having future cracking issues or any other sort of structural compromise is of course not worth the risk, so that is the biggest concern.

Again, I really appreciate any advice.
 

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World's Tallest Midget
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I don't think there's any way it won't crumble, but if you want, rent a trackhoe and knock yourself out. What's the worst that could happen?
 

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Old School
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Whatcha got there? Somewhere just shy of 6 tons? Ouch.
 
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One other problum is the bottom of it's not going to be flat so it would not sit level and not be fully supported under it when moved.
 

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JOATMON
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Personal opinion.....cut off 6 1/2" at the rear....pour a new 6 1/2' in the front...along with the ramp leading up to it.

You can drill into the existing foundation at the front and install dowel rods....this will help it stay aligned vert with the new portion of slab.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the help so far. I figured I was just being optimistic (dreaming/delusional - take your pick) that it could be moved. What about sawing the 6 feet off the back of the slab, which would conform with the setback regulation, then, pouring 6 feet (by 20) of new concrete in front of the remaining slab? At least i'd salvage half of the slab.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Personal opinion.....cut off 6 1/2" at the rear....pour a new 6 1/2' in the front...along with the ramp leading up to it.

You can drill into the existing foundation at the front and install dowel rods....this will help it stay aligned vert with the new portion of slab.
Beat me to it!
 

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If this were against a footing or something one could push off of, I would try moving it. I would get some jacks between the slab and the thing to push against and I'm sure it would move if you had a jack every 2 feet.

But I'm guessing you don't have anything to push against.
 

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Do you need to remove the back portion? Leave it if you can and use it for a patio or equipment parking zone. Just add the 6 feet in front for the building.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
No, I do not have anything I could jack against but that's a good idea.

I'm glad you mentioned leaving that 6 feet, I had not thought of that. I called the city and I can leave that section of slab there, as long as the shed is not on it. If they need to get into that area for utility/drainage work I would have to demo/remove it.

I will cut that 6 feet away from the rest of the slab now since I wouldn't be able to make a nice cut right up against the shed after it's on there.

Thank you all for the input.
 

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Master General ReEngineer
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Thanks for the help so far. I figured I was just being optimistic (dreaming/delusional - take your pick) that it could be moved. What about sawing the 6 feet off the back of the slab, which would conform with the setback regulation, then, pouring 6 feet (by 20) of new concrete in front of the remaining slab? At least i'd salvage half of the slab.
Ayuh,.... Do that, 'n the 6' drop piece can sit right there, til the utility company needs to dig under it,....

Ya get a dry patio for yer shed,...
 

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Civil Engineer
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If you are absolutely intent on moving it, and you live in a cold climate, I suggest this. Wait until the temperature is about 20 degrees or lower. Run the hose and create a thin layer of ice adjacent to the slab, large enough that you can slide the slab over to the new position. Once you get the slab going, using a bobcat or similar piece of equipment, or even a four wheel drive pickup and some ropes tied around the slab, it should go pretty easily over the ice. Move it to the desired location, let the ice melt, then have a beer to celebrate.

This is almost certainly not worth the effort, but it would make an interesting You Tube video. Kind of like the huge rocks that slide in Death Valley due to frost action under them.
 

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GA DNR regularly contracts to have 20' x 30' x 8" steel reinforced boat ramps cast on shore then pushed into the water

can you get a 1 1/2 or 2T truck w/articulated ( figure 4 ) crane next to the slab(s),,, i'd saw thru the contraction jnt then pick up 1/2 & swing it to the new location,,, only you can make that call - the major issue is getting a good ' grab ' or grip on the slab whether picking or sliding
 
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