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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello
After a few days of vacation, I was welcomed back to reality by the noise of water drops hitting something. I eventually found the drops dripping inside my central ac unit. The water was dripping from the coils and drip tray, I'm sure, down to the intake box underneath

I checked the blower's drain line pvc, and it is almost full to the top with ac running or not.

What can I begin to check? I obviously have a blockage somewhere in that drain line, right?
Unfortunately, I don't know where the external pvc drain is located to do suction.

Thank you
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If there's a condensate drain trap, make sure it's clear/not clogged.

Check for ice buildup on the larger refrigerant line pipe that's insulated.
 
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The drain tray under equipment is over emergency overflows.

Above that, there are two condensate lines connected to coil drain pan (you can't see the pan, it's encased in metal), need to make sure those lines and trap are not clogged.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The drain tray under equipment is over emergency overflows.

Above that, there are two condensate lines connected to coil drain pan (you can't see the pan, it's encased in metal), need to make sure those lines and trap are not clogged.
Thank you 123
Can you swnd me a picture or web link of what you describe? Please
 

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No picture needed because your picture already shows two white condensate lines coming from the coil drain pan, I think I see the emergency pan underneath.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No picture needed because your picture already shows two white condensate lines coming from the coil drain pan, I think I see the emergency pan underneath.
Underneath the 2 white lines is the filter cover door.

So I need to make sure those 2 white lines arw clear. But I see that they're not. If I insert my pinkie finger, I touch water in both.
 

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There may be water in there due to a trap downstream.

They should not be blocked up with gunk.

Can you post a zoomed out picture of the setup?

Your problem may not be caused by block condensate lines/trap -> having the coil freeze up and defrost can do it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There may be water in there due to a trap downstream.

They should not be blocked up with gunk.

Can you post a zoomed out picture of the setup?

Your problem may not be caused by block condensate lines/trap -> having the coil freeze up and defrost can do it.
Thank you very much
Here I zoom out. I do not know where that drains out, but I'll ask a neighbor with the same house, and hopefully he knows.
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So, if there is a blockage, the most likely culprit is the trap, which is that curvy 90 degree piece at the bottom.

Remove the cap on the top right, and see if that vertical section is full of water - it shouldn't be - there should be water in the trap only.

To clean, looking at trying to suck everything out with a shop vac downstream of the trap, pushing some wire or a thin snake through. Absolute last resort is cutting the condensate lines to get to the trap, re-joining with couplings and cement.

If the vertical section is clear, condensate lines aren't the problem here.
I do see a overflow cut-off, but it may not be working or wired in.
It's supposed to stop the a/c from running if the primary condensate line gets blocked.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So, if there is a blockage, the most likely culprit is the trap, which is that curvy 90 degree piece at the bottom.

Remove the cap on the top right, and see if that vertical section is full of water - it shouldn't be - there should be water in the trap only.

To clean, looking at trying to suck everything out with a shop vac downstream of the trap, pushing some wire or a thin snake through. Absolute last resort is cutting the condensate lines to get to the trap, re-joining with couplings and cement.

If the vertical section is clear, condensate lines aren't the problem here.
I do see a overflow cut-off, but it may not be working or wired in.
It's supposed to stop the a/c from running if the primary condensate line gets blocked.
The vertical pipe is full up to 3/4 inch from the top, and the ac does run. I accidentally touched the overflow kill switch, and it shut off the ac, so it's definitely wired and working.
Thanks for your thoughts and I will investigate further.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
sounds like it's just a blockage.
123, an update.
I took the panels off, and surely I saw a lot of floating hair-like creatures and grey mold. I used a hose to suck-syphon water and whatever out of the vertical pipe as far as possible.
I put it all back, and I don't hear the drip. During the cleaning, however, I did see and feel water leaking from the black triangle where the condensate lines screw in, see picture. It was right in the middle.
After more suctioning, it seemed to stop.

I don't own a shop vacuum.
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You still most likely have a plugged trap - that needs to be dealt with.

If it were to be re-piped, would be a good idea to put the trap close to the clean-out for easy maintenance, not a couple of feet down.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You still most likely have a plugged trap - that needs to be dealt with.

If it were to be re-piped, would be a good idea to put the trap close to the clean-out for easy maintenance, not a couple of feet down.
If I understood correctly, you suggest to move the curvy trap up to be near the removal plug, if I redo the piping. And then a 2 foot drop would come after to get to the existing exit line on the left.

What is the need for the trap? Why can't the piping be straight to let the water flow?
 

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I don't suggest moving it - just that if it's ever repipe, it is moved.

The trap is needed because the coil and drain pan are on the return side of the blower - there's suction.
The trap has water in it that stops air from rushing into the condensate line (being pulled in), which could interfere with proper drainage.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I don't suggest moving it - just that if it's ever repipe, it is moved.

The trap is needed because the coil and drain pan are on the return side of the blower - there's suction.
The trap has water in it that stops air from rushing into the condensate line (being pulled in), which could interfere with proper drainage.
I understand - don't move it, but if I repipe, then move it up a bit.

And the explanation makes sense about the trap. I had read that before and forgot.
 
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